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World Wildlife Fund On Balance

filtered by category: Renewables

  • Date: 31 July 2014
  • Author: Sandra Vijn, WWF

There’s another energy revolution developing from the most unlikely of places – cow manure

 

Today, President Obama released a “Biogas Opportunities Roadmap”, as part of the administration’s Climate Action Plan - Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions. The Roadmap promotes the market potential and benefits of biogas and encourages the adoption of closed-looped biogas systems. In action, this is collecting cow manure and allowing it to ferment in a sealed tank. The methane released during fermentation is captured and used for energy. In a closed-loop system, the “cooked” manure – essentially sterilized -- is separated into liquid and solid. The liquid is used as crop fertilizer and the solids can be used as cow bedding or compost.

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  • Date: 28 July 2014
  • Author: By Joshua Ryor, World Resources Institute (WRI) and Bryn Baker, World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Earlier this month, Walmart and 11 other major companies announced their commitment to a set of Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers’ Principles that outline how renewable energy providers and utilities can help meet the growing corporate demand for renewable energy.

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  • Date: 11 July 2014
  • Author: Marty Spitzer, Director US Climate and Renewable Energy Policy, WWF

What can rotary dial telephones, cathode ray tube (CRT) televisions and door to door milk delivery teach us about the renewable energy revolution? They show us how once commonplace products and services have and will always be replaced by newer ones. It’s not farfetched to say 2014 is to renewable energy what 1955 was to the CRT TV – the golden age of renewable energy is just now upon us.

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  • Date: 19 June 2014
  • Author: Bryn Baker, Manager of Renewable Energy, WWF

For the largest corporations in the United States, clean energy is business as usual. And it’s good for business and our planet. In fact, nearly half of the largest companies in the U.S. are capturing significant business value by cutting emissions and using clean forms of energy to power their operations.

A new report from WWF, Ceres, Calvert Investments and David Gardiner and Associates finds that, 43 percent, or 215 of the companies in the Fortune 500 have set targets in one of three categories: (1) greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction commitments, (2) energy efficiency, and (3) renewable energy.

Leaders such as Caterpillar, Dow Chemical, General Electric, General Motors, Procter & Gamble, Sprint, and Walmart have set targets across all three categories.

The largest companies in the Fortune 500 – the Fortune 100 – continue to lead: 60 percent of Fortune 100 companies have set clean energy and GHG reduction targets as of 2013. Since the first Power Forward report was released, companies like Apple and Pepsi have joined the ranks of other Fortune 100 companies with climate and clean energy targets.

The aggregate impact of the company actions is significant. Among the 53 Fortune 100 companies reporting on climate and energy targets to CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project), they are conservatively saving $1.1 billion annually through their emission reduction and renewable energy initiatives. In 2012 alone, these companies decreased their annual emissions by approximately 58.3 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent – comparable to retiring about 15 coal plants – saving them an average of $19 per ton of CO2 equivalent.

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The scale of these savings is likely to keep climbing rapidly as more companies realize the potential for big cost reductions enabled by energy efficiency and renewable energy. Individual companies have already achieved significant savings and have high expectations going forward. For example, IBM has saved a cumulative $477 million through its annual energy conservation actions. Walmart expects to save $1 billion globally per year through its renewable energy and energy efficiency initiatives. Dell estimates that improvements in the efficiency of its products will save customers $1.1 billion annually. The trends are clear: leading companies are capturing business value by executing effective clean energy strategies, and with proven results, more are sure to join the pursuit.

  • Date: 03 December 2013

Community choice aggregation is one new way that cities are bringing 100% renewable electricity to their residents. What is it and how does it work? Keya Chatterjee, WWF’s director of renewable energy and footprint outreach, explains in two minutes:

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  • Date: 06 November 2013
  • Author: Bryn Baker, manager, renewable energy, WWF and Dan Seif, principal, RMI

WWF and RMI Hold Forum with Large Companies on the Riddles of Renewables

Empowered by aggressive climate and energy targets, companies more than ever before are driving the transition to renewable energy – but that effort is not without hurdles.

WWF’s Power Forward report, for example, showed that 60 percent of the Fortune 100 and Global 100 companies have climate goals. To meet these targets, renewables are high on the hit list but companies are finding buying and investing in renewable energy particularly challenging, even when they’re putting their shoulders into it. Witness Google’s white paper calling for new approaches to expand renewable electricity procurement options.

To address these challenges, WWF and RMI held a Corporate Renewable Energy Buyer’s Day. Companies representing more than $1 trillion in annual revenue discussed and prioritized how to best execute against these challenges.

Here’s what we found:

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  • Date: 04 October 2013
  • Author: Keya Chatterjee

Today at the Sustainable Cleveland Summit, WWF awarded the cities of Cleveland and Cincinnati with our first 'Bright Place to Live' awards for providing 100% renewable electricity to residents.

Just as more and more companies are procuring renewable electricity for their operations, many US cities are now assessing their options for going renewable. Companies and cities alike are purchasing certified Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) that prove electricity was produced with renewable energy, going even further to sign contracts called Power Purchase Agreements to buy new renewable electricity, and even beginning to produce their own renewable energy.

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  • Date: 18 June 2013
  • Author: Mike Robinson - General Motors

Not too long ago I suppose, it would have been hard to believe that General Motors and World Wildlife Fund could be in agreement on how to protect the planet. But with today’s release of  The 3% Solution report by WWF and CDP, it has become clear to me that we are on the same page when it comes to many of the actions needed to halt the steady rise of the globe’s temperature.

I say this with confidence because the activity described in this report is similar to what we have been doing for the last three years – and I’m here to say that it works.

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  • Date: 13 June 2013
  • Author: Shaun Martin

You’re a business leader. You studied hard in business school, earned your MBA and as a result, are fully equipped to succeed. Well, almost.

If you are reading this blog, chances are you want to work from within a company to improve its performance while greening its business practices. Perhaps you’ve taken some courses on climate change and already understand the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Great! We need more people like you! But if you really want to make meaningful change, there are a five things you should understand that, in my opinion, are not taught nearly enough at institutions of higher education, whether in business, public health, engineering, or ecology. So before you set out to change the world, consider this:

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  • Date: 11 June 2013
  • Author: Marty Spitzer

WWF Report Makes the Business Case for Tackling Climate Change

Climate change is impacting each of us in profound ways. Intense storms, drought, heat waves, rising sea levels and warming oceans are becoming increasingly common. The world’s species are struggling to adapt. Biodiversity is declining. Habitats are threatened. Governments are spending record amounts of taxpayer dollars to rebuild after extreme weather. American businesses are seeing unpredictable weather patterns, resource shortages and extreme weather threaten their growth and productivity, and as a result, their profits.

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