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Catherine Plume

Managing Director, Coral Triangle Program

Catherine Plume
Media inquiries: (202) 495-4102 or communications@wwfus.org

With environmental experience ranging from the Peace Corps and CARE to The Nature Conservancy and WWF, Cathy has a wealth of knowledge to draw from as director of WWF’s Coral Triangle Program.

Cathy began her environmental career as a forestry and watershed management student. While she spent many years working on forestry-related issues, her work with blue whales and salmon aquaculture in Chile eventually brought her over into the marine world.

Cathy keeps track of and supports the important work of WWF that happens on the ground, or in many cases, in the waters of the Coral Triangle.  She loves the incredible diversity of life across the region and seeing how local people are taking action to bring about positive change. For example, in Wakatobi Marine Park in Indonesia, communities made the difficult decision to establish no-take zones in a fish spawning area, since stocks were declining.  They also decided to outlaw dynamite and cyanide fishing. While taking on these measures reduced the amount of fish they were able to bring home, their decisions paid off in the long run, and fish stocks are rebounding.  

Cathy incorporates WWF’s practices of sustainable living in her own life as well. She promotes recycling and composting in DC and commutes to work by bicycle.

“I’m continually humbled by ordinary people making significant changes to improve the environment.”

More on Catherine

Title

Managing Director

Education

  • MS - Watershed Management, University of Arizona
  • BS - Forestry, second degree in English, Austin State University

Areas of Expertise

  • Program design, implementation and monitoring for large scales projects focusing on forest and marine conservation.
  • On the ground experience implementing conservation projects in Latin America, West Africa and the Coral Triangle.

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