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Gabby Ahmadia

Senior Marine Scientist, Oceans

Gabby Ahmadia
Media inquiries: communications@wwfus.org

Dr. Gabby Ahmadia is a lead marine scientist on the Ocean’s Conservation team at WWF where she provides programmatic and technical support on a range of marine issues. She has expertise in tropical marine ecology, monitoring design and implementation, and impact evaluation of marine conservation interventions. She currently supports work in the Bird's Head and Sunda Banda Seascapes of Eastern Indonesia to better understand the linkages between MPAs and social and ecological outcomes. Gabby is also supporting work on coral reefs, climate, and fisheries to identify strategic conservation priorities in the Coral Triangle.

Originally hailing from Hawai‘i, Gabby has a wealth of experience, ranging from monitoring and eradication programs for invasive plant species in Natural Area Reserve Systems in Hawaii to marine ecophysiology to developing rapid vulnerability and resilience assessments for coral reefs. She has worked for over a decade on marine science and conservation issues across the Pacific Ocean, though has focused primarily on the Coral Triangle. Gabby completed her PhD in Coastal and Marine Systems Science from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, investigating factors that structure coral reef fish assemblages.

“By disentangling the complexities of what leads to successful conservation outcomes, we can design conservations strategies that have greater positive impacts. ”

In The News

More on Gabby

Media inquiries: communications@wwfus.org

Title

Senior Marine Scientist

Education

• Phd Coastal & Marine Systems Science, Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi (2012)
• MS Marine Biology, University Of West Florida (2008)
• BS Zoology, Humboldt State University (2004)

Areas of Expertise

• Coral Reef Ecology
    • Linking Social & Biophysical Factors To Ecosystem Status & Change
• Monitoring & Evaluation
    • Impact Evaluation
    • Regional Performance Measurements
• Marine Protected Areas
• Science Capacity Building

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