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Conservation Workshop Grants

Overview

Conservation Workshop Grants support non-governmental organizations, community groups, government agencies, and educational institutions. These grants support training courses and workshops in WWF priority ecoregions on topics of importance for local and regional conservation efforts.

To date, EFN has supported more than 400 organizations training over 20,000 participants.

Click here for guidelines, eligibility, and how to apply for workshop grant opportunities.

 

Additional Opportunities

EFN periodically offers additional workshop grant opportunities that focus on a topic or region of interest. At this time there are no additional grant opportunities available but EFN does anticipate additional funding in late September. Please visit this website periodically for updates.

20,000

participants

Through EFN workshop grants, local partners have trained more than 20,000 local participants on pressing conservation issues affecting their communities.

Why It Matters

  • Russell E. Train Fellowships

    Russell E. Train Fellowships support individuals pursuing a master’s or doctoral degree in conservation. Today’s conservation challenges are more complex than ever before and require advanced skills and knowledge to tackle pressing issues from climate change and deforestation to wildlife crime and rights-based fisheries management. EFN program provides fellowships to rising leaders to address these global challenges. To date, more than 90 percent of EFN fellows are working to advance conservation efforts in their home countries.

  • Conservation Workshop Grants

    Conservation Workshop Grants help organizations conduct training workshops to build local capacity. These grants support training courses and workshops in WWF priority places on topics of importance for local and regional conservation efforts. Workshops grants are essential to building local capacity in vulnerable communities and improving conservation efforts at a local and national scale.

  • Professional Development Grants

    Professional Development Grants provide support for mid-career conservationists to pursue short-term, non-degree training to upgrade their knowledge and skills. These grants provide the tools necessary for professionals to advance in their careers and improve local capacity in their home countries. EFN has supported more than 600 deserving mid-career professionals that are dedicated to conserving critical natural resources, advancing policy, and educating local communities on conservation issues important to advancing WWF's mission.

  • Alumni Grants

    Alumni Grants provide ongoing support of former fellows to conduct research or attend conferences, workshops, or short courses. These grants offer critical funding opportunities to Train Fellows and Scholars to continue to advance in their careers.

  • Reforestation Grants

    Reforestation Grants support local organizations engaged in reforestation projects throughout the tropics. When carefully planned, forest restoration activities can provide environmental services to the local community and develop new habitats in formerly bare areas. These grants support activities that aim to regain ecological integrity and enhance human wellbeing in deforested or degraded forest landscapes.

What WWF Is Doing

Conservation workshop grants are an opportunity for local and regional organizations to receive funding that supports local conservation efforts. These grants must include a hands-on field training component on a conservation issue critical to WWF's work in the region.

These grants cover travel expenses, meals and accommodations, room rentals, materials, and other related costs. Administrative costs are no more than 15 percent of the grant with typical grants between $1,500 and $7,500. EFN is proud to support WWF's local partners and encourage local capacity building in the world’s most ecologically important regions.

Proven Results

In 2011, EFN conducted a survey of organizations to measure the impact of the workshop grant program. The results noted in this section are examples of what WWF is doing to improve local conservation capacity in the places important to achieving WWF's mission to conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on Earth.

Russell E. Train Education for Nature Program

BUILDING INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY

Workshop grants are part of EFN’s larger goal to build institutional capacity at a local and national level. Sixty-seven percent of organizations that receive these grants have less than 24 employees and are classified as non-governmental organizations. More than 90 percent are local or national organizations. These numbers show the commitment EFN has to supporting small organizations that work at a local level to improve conservation efforts within their communities.

EXPANDING WWF PARTNERSHIPS WITH LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS

Almost 60 percent of all recipients have a working relationship with WWF on the ground while the remainder is working in places important to WWF’s work. WWF depends on strong partnerships and EFN works to improve these relationships by offering funding for partners to train their staff and local stakeholders on topics that align with WWF’s mission. To date, the majority of workshops have focused on training stakeholders, issues connecting conservation and indigenous communities, and protected area management.

FILLING THE FUNDING GAP

Seventy percent of workshop grant recipients report that funding is a major barrier to their mission of contributing to conservation in their home countries. EFN aims to fill the gap by providing these critical funds to advance conservation in the field. More than 50 percent reported that they would not have been able to hold the workshop without their Workshop Grants, and the remainder said that their Workshop Grants funds were very helpful, allowing them to hold a significantly longer, larger, or better training opportunities than would have been possible without the funds. Seventy percent were able to leverage EFN funding to attract other financial support to their organization. EFN grants provide opportunities for institutions to, not only train local stakeholders, but to improve their own institutional capacity as well.

Shanghai Roots & Shoots, an environmental NGO located in Shanghai, China was supported by EFN twice and as a result there are more than one thousand young people in China inspired to make a difference. The Roots & Shoots family will keep on inspiring young people to take care of their nature resources.

Rebecca Zheng Director of Youth for Environmental Sustainability, Shanghai Roots & Shoots

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