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Fuller Science for Nature Fund

Overview

The Kathryn Fuller Science for Nature Fund supports and harnesses the most promising conservation science research and puts it into practice. Named in honor of the former president and CEO of WWF-US, the fund supports an annual Science for Nature Symposium featuring global leaders in science, policy, and conservation. Additionally, a regular seminar series provides a regular forum for the conservation community.

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2016 Fuller Science for Nature Symposium

2° LATER
Resilience in a Changing World

As the world strives to limit global warming to 1.5C, we need to prepare for significant changes to communities, economies and the places we live and care about. To do this we must embrace a new approach to conservation built around managing, adapting to, and transforming with change: Climate resilience.

The 2016 Fuller Symposium on November 15, 2016 will bring together a diverse array of experts to discuss how resilience can be a useful framework to rethink sustainability and conservation in the age of climate change. We will look at how people and ecosystems respond to the rapid and often irreversible change facing our planet, and how we need to manage and approach the tough choices, such as where we should best invest our scarce resources for the future. Finally, we will explore some of the innovative thinking on resilience that will inevitably change the way we practice conservation.

The event is free and open to the public and will take place at the National Geographic Society’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C on November 15, 2016. It will also be streamed live on the web.

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QUARTERLY SEMINAR SERIES

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe. Seminars are:

  • Free
  • Open to the public
  • Held at WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)
  • Begin at 4:30 p.m., followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m.

For more information, contact Kate Graves at 202-495-4604.

QUARTERLY SEMINAR SERIES - OCTOBER 2016

Oceans and climate change
Crunch time for coral reefs?

Who: Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Professor and Director, Global Change Institute, University of Queensland
When: October 20, 2016
Where: WWF, 1250 24th ST NW, Washington, DC

The Paris Climate Agreement has been widely applauded as the first science-based targets to be agreed to by the international community. As yet to enter into force, the Paris targets will lead to the stabilisation of planetary conditions by mid-century, which will greatly reduce the current disruption to human and natural systems. But will they be enough? Climate trajectories and the known tolerance of many ocean ecosystems suggest major changes over the next 30 to 40 years before stabilisation is achieved (e.g. we will lose another 90% of coral reefs, Frieler et al. 2013). While confronting, this reality check suggests a two-part strategy of doubling down on climate change action while putting resources into managing non-climate stresses on the world’s ecosystems. The latter will be important if we are to maintain the genetic stock for the replenishment of ecosystems under a stabilised climate. These observations will be discussed within the context of the UNFCCC (COP21, IPCC) as well as the very timely establishment of the Sustainable Development Goal 14 on oceans.

Frieler, K., M. Meinshausen, A. Golly, M. Mengel, K. Lebek, S. D. Donner, and O. Hoegh-Guldberg. "Limiting global warming to 2oC is unlikely to save most coral reefs." Nature Climate Change 3, no. 2 (2013): 165-170.

About the Speaker
Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg (BScHons., Sydney; PhD., UCLA) is the inaugural Director of the Global Change Institute (GCI), member of the Australian Academy of Science, and Professor of Marine Science, at The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The GCI is a University level institute that is focused on bringing together the research capacity of UQ around some of the most pressing and serious challenges facing humanity worldwide, such as climate change, food security, clean energy and sustainable water. In addition to directing the GCI, Prof Hoegh-Guldberg leads an active research group interested in the biology and ecology of coral reefs, particularly the impact of ocean warming and acidification. He is among the most cited scientists in the area of climate change and ecology, and was the coordinating lead author for Chapter 30, (Oceans) for the latest IPCC and the Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. In 1999 he was awarded the Eureka Prize for his scientific research, and the Queensland Smart State Premier's Fellow (2008-2013). In 2012 he was awarded a Thomson Reuters Citation Award in recognition of his outstanding contribution to research and an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship, and the the Climate Change Prize from HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco in 2014.

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Projects

  • Kathryn S. Fuller Science for Nature Seminar Series

    WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to critical topics in international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe.

  • 2014 Fuller Symposium: Whole Planet, Full Plate

    The 2014 Fuller Symposium discussed how we can freeze the footprint of food while still nourishing billions. This one day event took place on November 12, 2014 at the National Geographic Society’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

View More Projects

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