Toggle Nav

Fuller Science for Nature Fund

Overview

The Kathryn Fuller Science for Nature Fund supports and harnesses the most promising conservation science research and puts it into practice. Named in honor of the former president and CEO of WWF-US, the fund supports an annual Science for Nature Symposium featuring global leaders in science, policy, and conservation. Additionally, a regular seminar series provides a regular forum for the conservation community.

Kathryn Fuller

Kathryn S. Fuller, former president and chief executive of World Wildlife Fund

What WWF Is Doing

2015 Fuller Symposium banner imageTiger © Talvinder Chohan/Alamy

2015 Fuller Science for Nature Symposium

Wired in the Wild
Can technology save the planet?
November 18, 2015

All of us depend on innovations in technology for our work, health and daily lives. Technological breakthroughs in the conservation space are changing the way we address the issues threatening our planet—from mobile applications that track illegally harvested wood to eDNA methods that monitor species like the Hellbender Salamander. Scaling up such innovative solutions requires learning from other sectors and tracking emerging opportunities.

The 2015 Fuller Symposium on November 18th will bring together thought leaders in science, policy, business, conservation and development to tackle the emerging issues facing our planet. This year’s symposium will explore the use of technology in conservation and the promise it holds for addressing some of the planet’s greatest challenges along with the disruptions we should expect from the same.

The event is free and open to the public and will take place at the National Geographic Society’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C. It will also be streamed live on the web.

Quarterly Seminar Series

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe. Seminars are:

  • Free
  • Open to the public
  • Held at WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)
  • Begin at 4:30 p.m., followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m.

For more information, contact Kate Graves at 202-495-4604.

 

Quarterly Seminar Series - September 2015

A Half Century of Conservation: How Did it Happen?
Celebrating Tom Lovejoy’s 50 years in the Amazon

Tom Lovejoy

 

For the past 50 years, Tom Lovejoy has been a leading mind in the field of conservation. He first set foot in the Brazilian Amazon as a graduate student in 1965 and conducted the first major long-term study of birds in the Amazon for his PhD. He was the first person to use the term ‘biological diversity’ in 1980 and was the originator of the innovative concept of debt-for-nature swaps. In 1979 he initiated the forest fragments project north of Manaus.

Conservation has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. From conservation biology becoming a recognized and reputable field of study, to discussions surrounding new threats, to the concept of the Anthropocene, conservation and conservation science have continued to evolve. In this seminar, Tom will review the development of conservation and related science throughout his career with particular reference to the Amazon, highlight significant developments, and look ahead to ongoing challenges and solutions.

When: September 16, 2015 at 4:30 pm. Reception to follow.

Where: WWF-US Headquarters, 2nd Floor Conference Center
1250 24th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20037

Register Nowh

Projects

  • Kathryn S. Fuller Science for Nature Seminar Series

    WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to critical topics in international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe.

  • 2014 Fuller Symposium: Whole Planet, Full Plate

    The 2014 Fuller Symposium discussed how we can freeze the footprint of food while still nourishing billions. This one day event took place on November 12, 2014 at the National Geographic Society’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

View More Projects