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2012 Fuller Symposium: Conservation Crime

We are in the midst of a crisis. The criminal exploitation of nature — the illegal killing, capture, and trade of wild species — has escalated to the point where it could undo generations of conservation efforts.
Fuller Symposium: Conservation Crime | November 14, 2012 | National Geographic Society | Washington, D.C.

 

We are in the midst of a crisis. The criminal exploitation of nature — the illegal killing, capture, and trade of wild species — has escalated to the point where it could undo generations of conservation efforts.

Scientific advancements, innovative technologies, and strengthened policy initiatives have the potential to turn the tide against the organized crime syndicates pushing many of our most iconic species toward extinction and putting local communities at risk.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment Robert Hormats discusses the interest the Department of State has in conservation crime and how it is addressing the issue.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Crawford Allan of Traffic North America and WWF-US sets the stage for the 2012 Fuller Symposium on conservation crime by discussing the current state of the crisis and why it has become an extreme problem at this point in time

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Dr. Kent Butts of the Army War College relates how conservation crime is linked with national security and how conservation groups can work with security agencies to stem the wildlife crime crisis.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Peter Knights, Executive Director of WildAid, discusses how PSAs in Asia can influence public understanding of illegal wildlife products and why they should not be purchased.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - As the director of the only forensics laboratory devoted to wildlife and forestry crime in the world, Ken Goddard will discuss crime scene investigation techniques for tracking and tracing illegal wildlife products, illegal logs, and illegally harvested corals.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - The founder of Google Earth Outreach, Rebecca Moore, discusses how communities and organizations have effectively used Google Earth to track and document illegal wood harvesting, to document illegal traps and snares used to capture chimps, and many other innovative uses of their technology.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Tracing illegally harvested wood has made great strides through the U.S. Lacey Act ban on the illegal timber trade. This talk demonstrates how you can determine if wood is harvested illegally.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Dr. Lian Pin Koh is one of the world's leaders on using UAVs for conservation. He discusses the future for such technology in conservation to track wildlife and poachers, as well as the limitations.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - WWF-International's African Great Apes Program Coordinator David Greer outlines large-scale threats driven by the current poaching crisis.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Monica Medina of the U.S. Department of Defense moderates a discussion on the organized crime links with wildlife crime and impacts on national security. Participants: Crawford Allan, TRAFFIC North America and Dr. Kent Butts, U.S. Army War College. Views expressed by Monica Medina are her own.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - From the perspective of working in the private sector, Eric Phu discusses how marketing and advertising can be used to effectively change behavior in Asia.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - WWF-US's chief scientist Dr. Jon Hoekstra moderates a discussion on innovation technological solutions to conservation crime. Participants: Ken Goddard, Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory; Adam Grant, World Resources Institute; Dr. Lian Pin Koh, ETH Zurich; and Rebecca Moore, Google Earth.

  • Video: Watch Fuller Symposium Speakers - Dr. Elizabeth Bennett of the Wildlife Conservation Society will discuss lessons from the field and how they can be used to implement effective policy to solve the conservation crime crisis.

Global leaders shared their insights on the growing crisis of wildlife crime at the 2012 Fuller Symposium. The symposium was held on November 14, 2012 at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C.

Download the program brochure

Download the Fuller Wildlife Crime Workshop document

Speakers

Rebecca Moore

Engineering Manager, Google Earth Outreach and Earth Engine
Google, Inc.
Geospatial technologies for tracking and reducing conservation crime

Dr. Robert D. Hormats

Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment
U.S. Department of State
Wildlife Diplomacy in Action

Dr. Kent Butts

Director, National Security Issues Branch, Center for Strategic Leadership
U.S. Army War College
Conservation crime: the national security dimensions

Dr. Elizabeth Bennett

Vice President for Species Conservation
Wildlife Conservation Society
Boots, science, and policy: the essential trinity to combat wildlife crime

 

View Complete List of Speakers h

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