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Photos from Camera Traps in Nepal

  • Shikari Pothi

    Tiger photographed in the Suklaphanta Wildlife Reserve, Nepal. The local name of the tiger is "Shikari Pothi". Shikari means Hunter and Pothi means Female in Nepali.

  • Tiger

    Tiger photographed in the Suklaphanta Wildlife Reserve, Nepal. The local name of the tiger is "Salgaudi Bhale". Salgaudi is the name of a lake; Bhale means Male in Nepali.

  • Two curious tiger cubs inspect the cameras.

  • Female tiger with two cubs

    Female tiger with two cubs.

  • Tiger running from camera trap

    Tiger frightened by the flash of the camera.

  • Tiger

    In a single season, this tiger was photographed six times in different locations, making him the most photographed tiger in Bardia National Park.

  • Common bear

    The common bear is poached for its bile.

  • Leopard

    Leopard in Babai Valley in Bardia National Park.

  • Rhino

    Rhino caught on camera in a corridor restoration area. Wildlife frequently use this corridor to travel between protected areas.

  • Tiger dragging a carcass

    Tiger in the Khata Corridor dragging a carcass.

  • Wild board

    The wild boar is a common prey species for tigers in the Terai Arc Landscape.

  • Elephant

    The camera trap crew was lucky to get a picture of an elephant without it dismantling the camera. 

Camera traps placed in the Terai Arc Landscape in Nepal revealed a variety of images of big cats, rhinos, elephants and more. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film. Camera traps are not the intricate and elaborate devices you might imagine. These innovative conservation tools are in fact nothing more than everyday cameras, armed with infrared sensors that take a picture or video whenever they sense movement in the forest.

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