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  • Camera Trap Video of a Rhino

    WWF captured the first-ever camera trap video of a rhino in Borneo. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

  • Camera Trap Photos of Amur Leopards

    A camera trap in a protected area in Russia has captured photos of eight Amur – one of the world’s most endangered wild cats. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Amur leopard
  • Photos from Camera Traps in the Amazon

    The Amazon's lush forests are home to a stunning variety of life. WWF has captured images of the some of the region's magnificent species – from jaguars to armadillos.

  • Photos from Camera Traps in Nepal

    Camera traps placed in the Terai Arc Landscape revealed a variety of images of big cats, rhinos, elephants and more. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

  • Camera Trap Photo of Bush Dog in Brazil

    A camera trap image of a bush dog in Veredas do Peruacu State Park in Brazil was recorded in October 2012 by WWF and the Biotropicos Institute. The bush dog, also called the vinegar or savannah dog, is often referred to as a ghost by researchers.

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