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  • Conserving Wildlife and Enabling Communities in Namibia

    Namibia is home to an array of wildlife, from ostriches and zebras roaming the gravel plains to penguins and seals chilling in the Atlantic currents. It was the first African country to incorporate protection of the environment into its constitution. With WWF’s help, the government has reinforced this conservation philosophy by empowering its communities with rights to manage and benefit from the country’s wildlife through communal conservancies.

  • Empowering Community Leaders in Colombia to Overcome Land Conflicts

    Competition over land is both a direct and underlying cause of conflict in Colombia, South America. WWF focuses on tackling fundamental causes of conflict such as control of land and access to natural resources, while enabling indigenous groups to assert their rights.

  • Working with Traditional Conservation Ethics to Protect the Sacred Himalayas

    In the Himalayas WWF’s work is based on recognition that the spiritual beliefs and traditional conservation ethics of local communities need to be at the center of efforts to protect endangered species and support sustainable livelihoods.

  • Managing Marine Resources in the South Pacific

    The marine resources of the South Pacific region are threatened by major challenges. WWF believes that sustainable livelihood, development and conservation efforts are most successful when community groups adopt conservation initiatives and make their own management choices.

  • Securing a Future for Forests and Communities in Bolivia

    Indigenous communities control 30 percent of forested land in the Bolivian lowlands. The sustainable management of this land is essential to ensuring a prosperous future for Bolivia, its indigenous people and the environment. In this country and elsewhere, WWF plays a key role in helping community organizations strengthen their ability to promote sustainable forestry.