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  • 2012 Fuller Symposium: Conservation Crime

    Global leaders shared their insights on the growing crisis of wildlife crime at the 2012 Fuller Symposium. The symposium was held on November 14, 2012 at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C.

    We are in the midst of a crisis. The criminal exploitation of nature — the illegal killing, capture, and trade of wild species — has escalated to the point where it could undo generations of conservation efforts.
  • Wildlife Crime Technology Project

    The world is dealing with an unprecedented spike in wildlife crime. In December 2012, Google awarded WWF a $5 million Global Impact Award to create an umbrella of technology to protect wildlife.

    Three elephants
  • Conserving Snow Leopards, Securing Water Resources, and Benefiting Communities

    In October 2012, WWF began a four-year project to conserve snow leopard habitat, promote water security, and help communities prepare for climate change impacts in Central Asia. The USAID-funded, $4.7-million Conservation and Adaptation in Asia’s High Mountain Landscapes and Communities project will conduct field activities in and build alliances among six of the snow leopard’s 12 range countries: Bhutan, India, Nepal, Mongolia, Kyrgyzstan, and Pakistan. The project will run through September 30, 2016.

    Snow Leopard
  • Developing a Scalable Basin Report Card

    With this report card, WWF will help change how water is managed around the world by communicating complex environmental issues to a wide variety of stakeholders; informing decision-makers about the impacts of their actions; raising awareness about freshwater health among civil society; and, changing behavior and policies to measurably improve basin health.

    La Planada Nature Reserve, Colombia
  • WWF & Coca-Cola’s Work to Conserve Fresh Water

    Together, The Coca-Cola Company and WWF are working to use water more efficiently within the Coca-Cola system and conserve freshwater resources around the world. Because Coca-Cola depends on freshwater supplies, understanding watersheds and how they work is extremely important to its business.

    Local woman rowing a boat on a branch of the Mekong river