Toggle Nav

Projects

  • Monitoring Tigers in Nepal

    A July 2012 camera trap study in Nepal identified 37 individual tigers—a marked increase from 18 tigers counted in 2009. The tigers were monitored over a three-month period inside Bardia National Park in Nepal and the Khata wildlife corridor in the Terai Arc Landscape.

    Tiger
  • Monitoring Coral Reef Health in Indonesia

    Off the tip of the Bird’s Head Peninsula of West Papua, Indonesia lie the islands of Raja Ampat, a marine oasis within the Coral Triangle. WWF Marine Conservation Biologist Helen Fox is part of a project to monitor coral reef health in Raja Ampat, in collaboration with Conservation International (CI) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).

  • WWF & Coca-Cola’s Work to Conserve Fresh Water

    Together, The Coca-Cola Company and WWF are working to use water more efficiently within the Coca-Cola system and conserve freshwater resources around the world. Because Coca-Cola depends on freshwater supplies, understanding watersheds and how they work is extremely important to its business.

    Local woman rowing a boat on a branch of the Mekong river
  • Human-Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Measures in Nepal

    The most basic needs—for both humans and animals—are food, water and shelter. When basic needs are threatened, conflicts arise. In the high mountains of Asia, WWF seeks to reduce human-wildlife conflict through projects like the USAID-funded Conservation and Adaptation in Asia’s High Mountain Landscapes and Communities.

    snow leopard corral sign
  • The Natural Capital Project

    The Natural Capital Project is a partnership that works to align economic forces with conservation by mainstreaming natural capital into decision making. By developing a scientifically-sound, reliable way to assess the true value of the services that ecosystems provide, WWF works to stop the degradation of the most important places on the planet.

X

Our privacy policy has changed. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the new policy.