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Projects

  • Workshop grantees
  • Bhutan: Committed to Conservation

    Bhutan is at the heart of the Eastern Himalayas, which supplies one-third of the world’s freshwater. And the country’s forests help keep climate change at bay by absorbing carbon dioxide. Bhutan is one of the world’s 10 most biodiverse countries. But Bhutan’s natural resources are on the brink of being more threatened now than ever before, despite the government’s political will and conservation milestones. Why? The country has changed more in the last 50 years than the past 500 years combined.

    hilltop structure
  • Conserving Wildlife and Enabling Communities in Namibia

    Namibia is home to an array of wildlife, from ostriches and zebras roaming the gravel plains to penguins and seals chilling in the Atlantic currents. It was the first African country to incorporate protection of the environment into its constitution. With WWF’s help, the government has reinforced this conservation philosophy by empowering its communities with rights to manage and benefit from the country’s wildlife through communal conservancies.

  • Monitoring Tigers in Nepal

    A July 2012 camera trap study in Nepal identified 37 individual tigers—a marked increase from 18 tigers counted in 2009. The tigers were monitored over a three-month period inside Bardia National Park in Nepal and the Khata wildlife corridor in the Terai Arc Landscape.

    Tiger
  • Monitoring Coral Reef Health in Indonesia

    Off the tip of the Bird’s Head Peninsula of West Papua, Indonesia lie the islands of Raja Ampat, a marine oasis within the Coral Triangle. WWF Marine Conservation Biologist Helen Fox is part of a project to monitor coral reef health in Raja Ampat, in collaboration with Conservation International (CI) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).