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Projects

  • Sustainable Sourcing

    WWF is helping companies trace products from origin to the store shelf, measuring the impacts along the way. By exploring solutions like doubling down on existing farmland, rehabilitating degraded lands, and helping consumers become part of the solution, it’s possible to meet this growing demand and still maintain a living planet.

  • Advancing Responsible Lending

    A rapidly growing global population, accelerating consumption, dietary shifts, climate change and other factors are driving unprecedented price volatility, resource shortages, and other risks in soft commodity supply chains. These challenges pose material, reputational and systemic risk to investors. WWF seeks to help investors untangle this complexity. Through The 2050 Criteria: Guide to Responsible Investment in Agriculture, Forest, and Seafood Commodities, WWF provides investors with a field guide for identifying good performers in agricultural, forest, and seafood sectors.

    SoyField_258926_Industries
  • Camera Trap Video of a Tiger

    WWF caught this tiger on camera in Malaysia. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Tiger Nepal Camera Trap
  • Empowering Community Leaders in Colombia to Overcome Land Conflicts

    Competition over land is both a direct and underlying cause of conflict in Colombia, South America. WWF focuses on tackling fundamental causes of conflict such as control of land and access to natural resources, while enabling indigenous groups to assert their rights.

  • Photos from Camera Traps in China

    Camera traps are not the intricate and elaborate devices you might imagine. These innovative conservation tools are in fact nothing more than everyday cameras, armed with infrared sensors that take a picture whenever they sense movement in the forest.

    A passing panda

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