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  • Photos from Camera Traps in China

    Camera traps are not the intricate and elaborate devices you might imagine. These innovative conservation tools are in fact nothing more than everyday cameras, armed with infrared sensors that take a picture whenever they sense movement in the forest.

    A passing panda
  • Camera Trap Video of a Tiger

    WWF caught this tiger on camera in Malaysia. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Tiger Nepal Camera Trap
  • Sustainable Sourcing

    WWF is helping companies trace products from origin to the store shelf, measuring the impacts along the way. By exploring solutions like doubling down on existing farmland, rehabilitating degraded lands, and helping consumers become part of the solution, it’s possible to meet this growing demand and still maintain a living planet.

  • Working with Coca-Cola to Improve the Sustainability of Agricultural Ingredients

    Together, WWF and Coca-Cola have piloted projects on sustainable sugarcane cultivation in Australia, Brazil, South Africa, and Honduras, working with sugarcane farmers to align their practices with the Bonsucro Standard.

    Sugar cane
  • coral reef and mangrove Carrie Bow Cay Belize

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