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  • Wildlife Crime Technology Project

    The world is dealing with an unprecedented spike in wildlife crime. In December 2012, Google awarded WWF a $5 million Global Impact Award to create an umbrella of technology to protect wildlife.

    rangers by truck
  • The Urgent Issue of Captive Tigers

    Current rules protect some tigers and not others, and remaining legal loopholes leave captive tigers vulnerable to wildlife traffickers and the international trade in tiger parts – the same trade that is the primary threat to wild tigers.

    captive tiger behind fence
  • Thirty Hills

    WWF and partners secure protection for critical rain forest in Sumatra. Thirty Hills is one of the last places on Earth where elephants, tigers and orangutans coexist in the wild.

    orangutan in Thirty Hills, Sumatra
  • 2012 Fuller Symposium: Conservation Crime

    Global leaders shared their insights on the growing crisis of wildlife crime at the 2012 Fuller Symposium. The symposium was held on November 14, 2012 at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C.

    We are in the midst of a crisis. The criminal exploitation of nature — the illegal killing, capture, and trade of wild species — has escalated to the point where it could undo generations of conservation efforts.
  • Monitoring Tigers in Nepal

    A July 2012 camera trap study in Nepal identified 37 individual tigers—a marked increase from 18 tigers counted in 2009. The tigers were monitored over a three-month period inside Bardia National Park in Nepal and the Khata wildlife corridor in the Terai Arc Landscape.


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