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Rhino Day Trumpets Poaching Crisis

Across South Africa, people made a loud call to action for an end to rhino poaching

Rhino Crime Scene Investigators
African Renaissance caused waves across Cape Town with their CSI-style guerrilla action on the rhino poaching crisis

Africa’s rhinos received a massive—and loud—show of support during Rhino Day on September 22. South Africans all around the country blew their vuvuzelas as a symbolic call for immediate action to stop rhino poaching through strengthened law enforcement and strict legal penalties.

Since 2009, over 200 rhinos have been poached in South Africa alone. The horns are smuggled primarily into Asia, driven by a booming demand that has seen poaching hit record highs.

“The purpose of Rhino Day was to draw attention to the alarming level of rhino poaching happening in southern Africa,” said Matthew Lewis, WWF’s African species expert. “The public has spoken loudly through their support for this rhino campaign, telling the government to crack down on poaching syndicates and aggressively prosecute suspected poachers.”

More importantly, WWF’s campaign is having an impact beyond fundraising and awareness. Over the last few weeks, the government has been cracking down on rhino poaching syndicates, thanks to public pressure. Two veterinarians were among 11 people arrested for allegedly being involved in rhino-poaching activities earlier this week and were taken to court, very fittingly, on Rhino Day.

This September, the spotlight is on stepping up security efforts in areas with high rates of poaching, highlighting the poaching crisis among South Africans and raising funds to support the rangers who put their lives on the line to protect Africa’s rhinos.

Please continue to spread the message that rhino horns belong on rhinos.

Learn more: 

  • TRAFFIC
  • Rhinos
  • African Rhino Poaching Crisis

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