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  • Celebrating the biggest conservation wins of 2016

    December 01, 2016

    The past year has shown us that when we work together, we can challenge the threats to nature and help ensure its ability to provide—for the sake of every living thing. Take a look at 2016 in review.

    Elephants close
  • Arrival of baby orangutan is a symbol of hope for conservation in Sumatra

    November 30, 2016

    One of the last great stands of rain forest in the deforestation hotspot of the Indonesian island of Sumatra has welcomed an exciting new addition: a baby female orangutan. The infant is the first orangutan born in the Thirty Hills conservation concession since WWF and its partners began managing the 100,000-acre forest in 2015.

    Orangutan Violet with her newborn baby
  • Nine big wins for the world’s tigers

    November 17, 2016

    In November 2010, 13 tiger range countries came together and made an unprecedented pledge: to double the number of wild tigers by 2022. Mobilized by a century of dramatic decline, leaders convened in St. Petersburg, Russia to sign a declaration boosting tiger conservation efforts. This initial effort has led to significant momentum and progress, and for the first time in 100 years, tiger numbers are on the rise. Here are some highlights from the last six years. 

    Bengal cub walking in a meadow in India
  • Community leaders work to protect Papua's forests and fight climate change

    November 09, 2016

    Community leaders in Papua are inspiring people to support the approach that local communities, WWF, and others are starting to use to save Papua’s forests—which are some of the largest remaining intact forests in Southeast Asia, but are increasingly at risk of being destroyed to make room for palm oil plantations, as well as mining and industrial logging operations.

    Alex Waisimon
  • Extreme weather threatens monarch butterfly habitat

    August 22, 2016

    Extreme weather caused by climate change is now a primary driver of forest degradation in key wintering habitat for monarch butterflies in Mexico, according to a new report.

    monarchs in trees in Mexico
  • Community voices help shape conservation program for the Democratic Republic of Congo

    August 10, 2016

    Local communities, Democratic Republic of Congo government representatives, WWF, and others met earlier this year to discuss plans for a forest conservation program in Maï-Ndombe.

    WWF is working in the Mai Ndombe region of the Democratic Republic of Congo to build community engagement in reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, also known as REDD+. Our aim, in collaboration with communities and governments, is
  • Addressing drought and other challenges in Mozambique

    August 02, 2016

    Participants of the weeklong workshop, which was hosted by WWF and the Natural Capital Project, learned how to map out Mozambique’s natural resources, why the resources are important, how to build them into decisions about infrastructure and development, and more.

    Mozambique is taking stock of its natural resources to better protect them for both wildlife and people.
  • Beyond Monkoto Road

    June 13, 2016

    Thirty years later, WWF's Kate Newman returns to find signs of elephants, bonobos and more in Salonga National Park

    boats in Salonga National Park
  • New hope for Africa's largest forest park

    May 30, 2016

    As the second largest tropical forest park in the world, Salonga is a global treasure. It is home for bonobos and one of the last remaining habitats for the forest elephant. Now, a newly signed agreement brings together the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN) and WWF to co-manage the protected area.

    ranger in Salonga National Park
  • New US regulations around captive tigers could provide a boost for wild tigers

    April 05, 2016

    Tiger populations fighting for a comeback in the wild will receive a much needed lifeline from the United States government. Improved and tightened regulations around captive tigers will make it more difficult for captive-bred tigers to filter into and stimulate the illegal wildlife trade that threatens wild tigers in Asia.

    Tigers
  • For the first time in 100 years, tiger numbers are growing

    April 10, 2016

    After a century of constant decline, the number of wild tigers is on the rise! According to the most recent data, at least 3,890 tigers now exist in the wild—up from an estimated 3,200 in 2010.

    tiger in grass
  • Survey suggests migratory monarchs are rebounding—with a long road ahead

    February 26, 2016

    A new survey conducted last December indicates migratory monarch butterfly populations grew in 2015, occupying almost 10 acres of forest in their hibernation sites in Mexico. Though this shows a boost from the previous two years, the numbers are considerably low compared to 20 years ago.

    monarch on flower
  • Managing the forest factory

    Eduardo Escompani Viñas is a shiringuero; he collects natural latex from shiringa trees. He and the other members of ECOMUSA, a cooperative of natural rubber producers, feel duty-bound to protect their natural resources and their way of life. They demonstrate that there are ways to reap the value and benefit of forests without harming them.

     

    Man getting latex from a tree
  • Major ivory trafficking network broken up in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    February 11, 2016

    In a significant blow to the illegal ivory trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), authorities dismantled a major ivory trafficking syndicate thanks to a law enforcement supported by WWF and partners.

    Guard with hand held GPS device for recording gorilla locations
  • First twins born to habituated gorilla family in the Central African Republic

    February 08, 2016

    Still too young to be named, the most recent additions to the gorilla population in the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas (DSPA) complex in the Central African Republic (CAR) are nevertheless making a name for themselves—as the first twins ever to be born to the area’s habituated gorillas.

    Gorilla mother with her twins
  • Flavors of Nature: Food from the protected areas of Peru

    December 03, 2015

    A growing number of cooks in Peru rely on the country’s protected areas—parks, nature reserves, and sanctuaries—to keep their menus vibrant and their customers satisfied. That's part of why WWF is working with the Peruvian government and partners to fund the proper management of protected areas.

    chef cooking in Peru
  • Protecting a forest across generations

    November 19, 2015

    US forest landowners play a huge role in saving the world’s forests. One way they can do so is by getting their land certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Learn how Stacey Locke did this—in collaboration with WWF, Domtar and others—and why her family’s forest in Arkansas is now a model for landowners across the Southeast.

    top of a pine tree
  • Collaborating to permanently protect Peru's natural treasures

    Public, private, national, and international partners, including WWF, are working on a way to fund the permanent protection of Peru’s natural treasures. Such funds could be used to conduct wildlife surveys, create jobs in ecotourism, and purchase equipment that enables park rangers to better patrol protected areas.

    forest in peru
  • Producing better palm oil for people, profits, and the planet

    There’s a way we can have our palm oil and eat it too. By producing palm oil sustainably, growers and manufacturers can offer traders, retailers, investors, and consumer products that meet their needs in a way that’s good for the planet, people, and profits.

    palm oil close up
  • Partnering to Protect a Vital Water Source in Guatemala

    October 08, 2015

    WWF and the Fundacion Defensores de la Naturaleza (FDN), which has official responsibility for managing the natural resources of Sierra de las Minas, work with local residents to protect the vast forests in the region—and the precious water that flows through them.

    sierra minas landscape
  • Stopping Illegal Logging in Africa

    September 10, 2015

    Many wood products in American homes—from the kitchen table to hardwood floors—come from the same forested areas in Africa where elephants, rhinos, lions and other magnificent species roam wild. Few purchasers know that the wood from these forests is illegal. It was harvested, transported, processed, bought or sold in violation of national laws.

    forest in kenya
  • What is FSC certification—and is it working?

    October 30, 2015

    What does the FSC® logo mean to you? Can you even name the type of products it references? Here’s the answer: the logo represents the Forest Stewardship Council®—and it signifies that the wood or paper product originated from a forest that was managed carefully with trees, animals, and local community benefit at heart.

    Forest in Ecuador
  • Endangered species threatened by unsustainable palm oil production

    The world’s most popular vegetable oil—palm oil—is produced in tropical rain forests around the world. While it can be produced sustainably, conventional production methods and unchecked agricultural expansion threaten these forests and the wildlife that call them home.

    orangutan
  • Twenty-Five Years in the Amazon

    August 25, 2015

    WWF's Meg Symington describes the luck and rewards of working to save the Amazon rain forest.

    Amazon

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