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  • CITES: Big steps for wildlife

    October 01, 2016

    During the world’s largest ever wildlife trade meeting—the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)—governments united behind a series of tough decisions to provide greater protection to a host of threatened species and bolster efforts to tackle soaring levels of poaching and wildlife trafficking.

    Head portrait of a Sumatran rhino
  • A ranger's commitment to wildlife

    October 01, 2016

    Anety is a wildlife police officer working in Zambia. She protects more than one hundred different species, including elephants, lions, and leopards, that call her park home. One of just three female wildlife rangers in her park, Anety works in a dangerous and under-resourced profession.

    Elephant in Zambia
  • Giving rhinos a lift since 2003

    September 28, 2016

    WWF’s Black Rhino Range Expansion Project (BRREP) has been working with passion, commitment, and determination for a brighter future for the critically endangered black rhino for more than a decade. BRREP works to relocate rhinos and provide equipment and training to rangers to monitor, manage, and protect rhino populations.

    black rhino calf in tall grass
  • A massive win for the world’s most trafficked mammal

    September 28, 2016

    All legal trade of pangolins, the world’s most trafficked mammals, will soon end thanks to an international agreement to further protect the critically endangered species from extinction.

  • Why CITES matters

    September 23, 2016

    One of the best tools we have for fighting the illegal wildlife trade that threatens many of the world’s most endangered species is CITES—the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

    Siberian tiger walking in snow
  • How humans and snow leopards can live in harmony

    August 30, 2016

    In herding communities in the Nepalese mountains, snow leopards were not considered beautiful creatures that needed protecting. To these communities, they were a direct threat that needed to be eliminated. Thankfully, after working together with conservationists and WWF-Nepal to find a solution to these problems, the communities have taken on ownership of the efforts to protect snow leopards.

    Snow Leopard
  • How Camera Traps Help Panda Conservation

    August 25, 2016

    Camera traps in China have captured images and video footage of giant pandas that are often difficult to see in the wild. The photographs and video are some of the most amazing images ever of pandas and other species in their remote habitat, which were caught on film as part of long-term wildlife monitoring projects set up in panda nature reserves by the Chinese government and WWF.

    Panda photographed by a camera trap
  • New US ivory regulations mark a victory in the fight to save elephants

    June 02, 2016

    Setting an example for the world in the fight to save elephants, the United States has finalized new regulations that will help shut down commercial elephant ivory trade within its borders and stop wildlife crime overseas.

    African elephant
  • Why we care about elephants on World Wildlife Day—and every day

    March 03, 2016

    Elephants number among the smartest and most empathetic creatures on the planet. This World Wildlife Day, we’re celebrating these magnificent animals—and emphasizing their need for our help.

  • Rhino translocation off to a positive start in Nepal’s Terai

    March 02, 2016

    A Greater one-horned rhino found a new home today in Nepal’s Bardia National Park through a successful translocation program. The move is part of a greater effort to create a second, viable population of Nepal’s rhinos to help restore the species to historic numbers.

    rhino in nepal
  • Survey suggests migratory monarchs are rebounding—with a long road ahead

    February 26, 2016

    A new survey conducted last December indicates migratory monarch butterfly populations grew in 2015, occupying almost 10 acres of forest in their hibernation sites in Mexico. Though this shows a boost from the previous two years, the numbers are considerably low compared to 20 years ago.

    monarch on flower
  • Protecting the Sumatran Rhino

    September 21, 2015

    The plight of Sumatran rhinos needs global attention and commitments if conservation is to succeed. The science is telling us that we can’t put off mounting a serious, concerted effort to save Sumatran rhinos. We have pulled three species of rhino back from the brink so we know we can do the same for the Sumatran rhino.

  • Ivory Crush in New York City

    June 19, 2015

    An enormous machine roared to life pulverizing more than one ton of illegal elephant ivory tusks, trinkets and souvenirs in the heart of New York City today. The ivory crush in Times Square sent a dramatic message to the world that the United States will not tolerate ivory trafficking. 

    african elephant
  • In Cambodia, Under the Stars and Alongside Dolphins

    April 07, 2015

    As tourism is slowly growing on the Camodian side of the Cambodia-Lao border, travellers can still discover hidden gems and set up tents on sandy islands in the Mekong river, amidst a small group of the rare Irrawaddy dolphins.

    dolphin jumping
  • WWF develops a new technology to stop poachers in their tracks

    WWF designed and installed a remarkable new thermal and infrared camera and software system that can identify poachers from afar and alert park rangers of their presence.

    Mike Feldman, electronic security technician for Unilux installing solar panels for FLIR camera system in a National Park in central Kenya.
  • Releasing black-footed ferrets into the wild

    In 2015, WWF marked its third consecutive year of black-footed ferret reintroductions on the Fort Belknap Reservation in northern Montana. WWF and partners also documented both first and second generation kits— young ferrets—born to individuals released in 2013 and 2014.

    black footed ferret released

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