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  • Working Together to Help Save Tigers

    January 08, 2013

    The first joint tiger survey in the Terai Arc Landscape was announced by the governments of India and Nepal. With help from WWF, this new tiger survey will use camera traps and other tools estimate tiger populations in an effort to protect this landscape that is home to an estimated 500 tigers.

  • Concerns Over Arctic Drilling Grow as Oil Rig Runs Aground in Alaska

    January 02, 2013

    An oil drilling rig operated by Shell Oil Company ran aground on a pristine wildlife-rich island in Alaska after a series of technological failures in gale force winds and high seas—driving home WWF's serious concerns about drilling in icy and remote Arctic waters.

    Kulluk sits aground on the southeast side of Sitkalidak Island, Alaska,
  • Remarkable Species Discovered in Southeast Asia

    December 18, 2012

    A new bat named after its fiendish appearance, a subterranean blind fish, a ruby-eyed pit viper, and a frog that sings like a bird are among the 126 species from the Greater Mekong newly identified by scientists and highlighted in a new WWF report.

  • A Hard Look at Sustainability Certifications

    December 14, 2012

    WWF’s Jason Clay examines the impacts of certification and its potential to achieve lasting results for conservation and people

    FSC logo painted on sustainable harvested logs. Uzachi forest, Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Integrating Nature’s Value into the Bottom Line

    December 14, 2012

    Coca-Cola is working to protect freshwater resources and ensure a sustainable future

  • At Work Among the Coral Reefs

    December 12, 2012

    Surveying the coral reefs of the Raja Ampat islands, WWF's Helen Fox works to protect marine areas for generations to come.

     

  • Wildlife Crime a Threat to Regional Security

    December 12, 2012

    A new report on the crisis of illegal wildlife trafficking details its unprecedented scale and global implications. Current global efforts to fight illegal wildlife trade are failing because wildlife crime is seen as an environmental problem first and then a criminal issue. At the same time, organized crime syndicates and rebel groups involved with wildlife crimes are increasing. Profits from wildlife trafficking could be used to purchase weapons, finance civil conflicts and underwrite terrorist-related activities.

  • Cities Commit to Prepare for Climate Change

    November 29, 2012

    Local governments across the U.S. join WWF’s inaugural Earth Hour City Challenge.

  • In Vietnam, Helping Catfish Farming Become More Sustainable

    November 27, 2012

    Farmed seafood is a rapidly growing industry and will represent a major source of protein in the worlds future food supply. It is imperative that farmed seafood is produced responsibly. A new certification agreement in Vietnam is a model for how both government and industry can ensure that is the case in the future.

    Pangasius aquaculture
  • Leading Change on the Water

    November 20, 2012

    Fisheries are complex entities with multiple actors and pressures shaping their future. Jesse Marsh leads WWF’s Major Buyer Initiative, which works with leading seafood buyers to advance their commitments to sustainable seafood and support suppliers on their journey towards Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification.

    Jesse Marsh
  • Uncertain Future for Polar Bears

    November 20, 2012

    Large swaths of Arctic sea ice shrink every summer in the northern ocean, but September 2012 showed the lowest amount of sea ice on record. Changes to the Arctic environment affect communities and species—especially ice-dependent animals like polar bears. WWF’s Rhys Gerholdt visited the frozen Arctic to see polar bears and reflects on the challenges ahead in this rapidly changing climate.

    Cubs chasing mother polar bear
  • Saving the Northern Great Plains

    November 16, 2012

    The communities and wildlife of the Northern Great Plains have not suffered the fate of the Dust Bowl on the Southern Plains. But threats loom—runaway oil and gas development, a changing climate, and agriculture policies that incentivize conversion of grasslands and wetlands to crops, regardless of expectations for crop success.

  • Rare Dolphin Offered a Second Chance

    November 15, 2012

    There are fewer than 100 Irrawaddy dolphins in the Mekong River of Southeast Asia, and researchers fear the numbers are shrinking even further. But now the dolphins may have something to smile about. In September local government agencies in Cambodia agreed to work with WWF to conserve dolphins and minimize or eliminate deaths from gillnets.

    Irrawaddy dolphin breaching
  • Good News for Mountain Gorillas

    November 13, 2012

    A population increase for mountain gorillas is proof that the intense and innovative efforts of the conservation community are bringing positive change. A recent census by the Uganda Wildlife Authority identified 400 mountain gorillas in Bwindi National Park bringing the overall population estimate to 880, an increase from the 786 estimated in 2010.

    Congo Basin Gorilla
  • Secretary of State Clinton Calls for End to Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

    November 08, 2012

    WWF’s campaign to stop wildlife crime gained a powerful champion—U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. On November 8, the U.S. State Department held an unprecedented event on illegal wildlife trafficking and conservation. In her remarks, Secretary Clinton called for an end to illicit wildlife trafficking, which she emphasized as a major foreign policy and security issue.

    U.S. Department of State / Michael
  • Hope for an End to Wildlife Crime

    November 07, 2012

    Crawford Allan, Regional Director, TRAFFIC North America, has translated his passion for the natural world into a long and fulfilling career. While he has seen the impact of illegal killing of rare species first hand and uncovered illicit wildlife trade in blackmarkets in dozens of countries, he remains hopeful.

    crawford_allan
  • The Mighty Mekong at Risk

    November 07, 2012

    The Mekong River’s spectacular biodiversity, rich fisheries and the livelihoods of millions are all at grave risk after the government of Laos broke ground on November 7, 2012 on a massive hydropower dam. The Xayaburi dam will be the first dam to span the entire mainstem of the lower Mekong River—home to more than 1100 freshwater fish species.

    Greater Mekong People and Communities
  • New Hope for Marine Life

    November 06, 2012

    On November 6, 2012, the Government of Mozambique announced the creation of the second largest marine protected area in Africa. Made up of ten islands off the coast of northern Mozambique, this coastal marine reserve in the Primeiras and Segundas Archipelago will cover more than 4020 square miles and contains abundant coral and turtle species.

    Local fishermen
  • Record Rains Motivate Vermont Citizens to Prepare for a Changing Climate

    November 02, 2012

    Record rains in 2011, coupled with a tradition of environmental leadership and citizen engagement, moved the city of Burlington, Vermont, to update its Climate Action Plan and join WWF’s Earth Hour City Challenge. Hear their story and learn why Jennifer Green, the city’s sustainability coordinator, is determined to make a difference.

    Flooding in Vermont
  • Pallas’s Cat Photographed for First Time in Bhutan

    October 31, 2012

    Camera traps have captured the first-ever photographic evidence of the Pallas’s cat in Bhutan’s Wangchuck Centennial Park (WCP). Also known as manul, this cat is a primitive species, defined by a strikingly flat head with high-set eyes and low-set ears that enable it to peer over rocky ledges in search of prey.

    Pallas Cat

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