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  • Making a better bear tracker

    June 23, 2016

    WWF has teamed up with global design company IDEO to brainstorm an innovative solution to more effectively gather information about polar bears.

    polar bears on ice
  • Hello World: our food, our wildlife, our responsibility

    June 08, 2016

    Everything we eat has some impact on planet Earth and the animals we share it with. Like us, wildlife need open spaces, clean water, and fresh air to survive. Discovery’s Hello World shares the stories of many miraculous creatures. Here’s how our food system affects these animals directly and what WWF is doing to help save them.

    People surrounding table with food and cheersing
  • Honoring Boulder as the 2016 US Earth Hour Capital

    June 22, 2016

    WWF is excited to recognize Boulder, Colorado as this year’s US Earth Hour Capital for its leadership inaddressing climate change. The title is awarded as part of our Earth Hour City Challenge initiative which highlights and supports local action on climate, including transitioning to 100 percent renewable energy, preparing for the impacts of extreme weather, and working with residents on strategies.

    boulder EHCC winner
  • Global momentum in elephant conservation

    June 20, 2016

    Elephants have been hit hard by a global poaching epidemic that’s emptying the planet of an array of wildlife. As many as 30,000 elephants are killed for their ivory each year. But people and governments are taking a stand for these remarkable animals – and making a tremendous impact.

    elephants at watering hole, Namibia
  • Rampant poaching threatens former elephant stronghold in Tanzania

    June 15, 2016

    Rampant ivory poaching has reduced the elephant population in Tanzania’s oldest and largest protected area by 90 percent in fewer than 40 years. WWF is sounding the alarm for urgent action in combating wildlife crime in the reserve.

    an elephant in Selous reserve
  • Beyond Monkoto Road

    June 13, 2016

    Thirty years later, WWF's Kate Newman returns to find signs of elephants, bonobos and more in Salonga National Park

    boats in Salonga National Park
  • A glimpse of a humpback whale swimming just beneath the surface

    June 08, 2016

    Whales roam through all of the world’s oceans, communicating with complex and hauntingly beautiful sounds.
    Their behavior is the most fascinating, least understood, most difficult to study, and least funded area of whale research today.

    whale beneath the surface
  • New US ivory regulations mark a victory in the fight to save elephants

    June 02, 2016

    Setting an example for the world in the fight to save elephants, the United States has finalized new regulations that will help shut down commercial elephant ivory trade within its borders and stop wildlife crime overseas.

    African elephant
  • New hope for Africa's largest forest park

    May 30, 2016

    As the second largest tropical forest park in the world, Salonga is a global treasure. It is home for bonobos and one of the last remaining habitats for the forest elephant. Now, a newly signed agreement brings together the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN) and WWF to co-manage the protected area.

    ranger in Salonga National Park
  • Nepal welcomes a new baby rhino

    May 26, 2016

    With immense pleasure, we’re welcoming the birth of one very special rhino in Nepal! Moved from one national park to another earlier this year to establish new populations in areas where they used to exist, a rhino gave birth to the male calf on May 22—an encouraging sign that the mother is thriving in her new environment. Four other rhinos were also translocated with her in March.

    rhino calf with mother
  • How bison helped shape the Northern Great Plains

    May 25, 2016

    At one point over 30-60 plains million bison roamed across North America. Moving hundreds of miles each year, they help shape the land and contribute to the overall health of the ecosystem. But after European settlement, the population was reduced to only approximately 500 animals.

    bison_info_slide_9_background
  • 5 remarkable animal dads

    In honor of Father’s Day, we’re celebrating some outstanding animal dads who go to great lengths for their offspring, whether it's protecting them from threats, keeping them warm and fed, or socializing them through play.

    Silverback gorilla with youngster
  • What kind of animals live in KAZA? And four other KAZA facts

    The Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) is home to almost half of Africa’s elephants, as well as an array of other animals such as African wild dogs, hippos, rhinos, lions, African buffalo, zebras, crocodiles, and cheetahs. Learn more about KAZA and what WWF is doing for it.

    Elephants at sunset in Namibia
  • The tiger among fish

    May 19, 2016

    The king of India’s Himalayan rivers is the mighty mahseer. The mahseer are not just pretty; they're important too. The mahseer is a flagship species for India.  A flagship species is a species selected to act as an ambassador, icon or symbol for a defined habitat, issue, campaign or environmental cause. Today, five of India’s mahseer species are listed as “endangered” and two as “near threatened” in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    River in India
  • Population of world's most endangered marine mammal drops 40 percent

    May 13, 2016

    The vaquita porpoise is growing nearer to extinction: Population has declined 40% to around 60 individuals, down from an estimated population of 97 vaquitas in 2014.

    Fins
  • Saving Colombia's daredevil fish

    Fishers have been noticing dramatic changes to the Orinoco River, and the daredevil fish in particular. In short, they're harder to find and no longer travel as far upstream. In an effort to save Colombia’s migratory fish, WWF-Colombia, the National Authority for Aquaculture and Fisheries (AUNAP), and other partners are focused on promoting more sustainable fishing practices throughout the supply chain. And, with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), WWF is trying to shed more light on the health of rivers and their vast biodiversity through projects like the basin report card.

    A man fishing on the Orinoco River in Colombia.
  • Sockeye salmon and climate change

    It’s hard to talk about salmon without talking Bristol Bay. Each year, at the end of June, in the world’s biggest sockeye salmon run, millions of fish flood the area’s rivers providing local communities with sustenance, fueling marine and seaside businesses, and contributing up to two-thirds of the state’s total salmon fishery value. But as June turned to July, there were hardly any salmon in Bristol Bay. People feared the worst. Where had all the fish gone?

    Rivers flowing and mountains in Alaska
  • Meet WWF's new Chief Scientist Dr. Rebecca Shaw

    WWF’s new Chief Scientist Dr. Rebecca Shaw is a brilliant thought leader who has been researching and leading interdisciplinary approaches to conservation and climate change for more than 30 years.

    Rebecca Shaw
  • Collaborating to Count Arctic Seals and Polar Bears

    May 11, 2016

    American and Russian scientists have now teamed up, with some help from WWF, to develop the region’s first comprehensive and reliable population estimates of ringed and bearded seals and polar bears.

  • Celebrating an amazing two years of zero rhino poaching in Nepal

    May 02, 2016

    Nepal marked two consecutive years since its last rhino was poached on May 2, 2014. This exceptional success is a result of a combination of high-level political will and government entities, and the active involvement of conservation communities.

    rhino in grass
  • New commitments for a brighter future in Guatemala’s Sierra de las Minas

    With a shared vision to preserve and restore the health of watersheds linked to the Sierra de las Minas, WWF and The Coca-Cola Company in Guatemala recently signed a five-year agreement to protect 350 hectares of forests connected to the Pasabién River basin in Zacapa, Guatemala, through prevention and control of forest fires.

    sierra minas landscape
  • Making shrimp sustainable in Thailand

    Shrimp farming is associated with mangrove destruction, water pollution, and illegal fishing and labor practices, but WWF is working with some of the world’s most innovative and conscientious farmers to demonstrate that shrimp production can be environmentally sustainable, socially responsible, and economically viable.

    farming shrimp
  • WWF celebrates and supports ranching stewardship programs

    Ranchers are often the first to admit they prefer to shy away from the spotlight. However, when they do participate, there is an opportunity to elevate the conversation about North American sustainable beef production and private lands stewardship while celebrating innovation and leadership with their peers. WWF supports stewardship award recognition programs in all five Northern Great Plains states (MT, ND, SD, WY, NE), where ranchers manage the majority of the NGP’s remaining intact grasslands. 

    Lyle Perman
  • Contributors: Summer 2016

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016

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