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  • Celebrating the biggest conservation wins of 2016

    December 01, 2016

    The past year has shown us that when we work together, we can challenge the threats to nature and help ensure its ability to provide—for the sake of every living thing. Take a look at 2016 in review.

    Elephants close
  • New anti-poaching technology leads to dozens of arrests of wildlife criminals in Africa

    November 21, 2016

    WWF installed a new thermal infrared camera that can identify poachers from afar by their body heat—even in the dead of night—and it has since transformed the way rangers track down and apprehend criminals since its introduction in March.

    A man installing solar panels for FLIR camera system
  • Nine big wins for the world’s tigers

    November 17, 2016

    In November 2010, 13 tiger range countries came together and made an unprecedented pledge: to double the number of wild tigers by 2022. Mobilized by a century of dramatic decline, leaders convened in St. Petersburg, Russia to sign a declaration boosting tiger conservation efforts. This initial effort has led to significant momentum and progress, and for the first time in 100 years, tiger numbers are on the rise. Here are some highlights from the last six years. 

    Bengal cub walking in a meadow in India
  • New research shows investing in elephant conservation is smart economic policy

    November 01, 2016

    WWF’s African Elephant Program funded a research project that used techniques from economics and statistics to better understand the value of elephant conservation to local economies in Africa.

    tourists watch an elephant
  • 6 things to know about Tanzania’s largest protected area—and why we need to save it

    Selous Game Reserve, one of Africa’s oldest reserves and Tanzania’s largest protected area, holds vast potential, but it also faces a number of threats. By bringing together governments, local communities, industry and civil society groups, we can transform Selous into a success story.

    Sunset over Selous Game Reserve in Tanzania
  • CITES: Big steps for wildlife

    October 01, 2016

    During the world’s largest ever wildlife trade meeting—the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)—governments united behind a series of tough decisions to provide greater protection to a host of threatened species and bolster efforts to tackle soaring levels of poaching and wildlife trafficking.

    Head portrait of a Sumatran rhino
  • A ranger's commitment to wildlife

    October 01, 2016

    Anety is a wildlife police officer working in Zambia. She protects more than one hundred different species, including elephants, lions, and leopards, that call her park home. One of just three female wildlife rangers in her park, Anety works in a dangerous and under-resourced profession.

    Elephant in Zambia
  • A massive win for the world’s most trafficked mammal

    September 28, 2016

    All legal trade of pangolins, the world’s most trafficked mammals, will soon end thanks to an international agreement to further protect the critically endangered species from extinction.

    Pangolin
  • Huge drop in African elephant population as poaching crisis continues

    September 25, 2016

    Africa’s elephant population has crashed by an estimated 111,000 in the past decade primarily due to poaching, according to the IUCN’s African Elephant Status Report.

    Elephants walking in KAZA
  • Why CITES matters

    September 23, 2016

    One of the best tools we have for fighting the illegal wildlife trade that threatens many of the world’s most endangered species is CITES—the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

    Siberian tiger walking in snow
  • Giving rhinos a lift since 2003

    September 28, 2016

    WWF’s Black Rhino Range Expansion Project (BRREP) has been working with passion, commitment, and determination for a brighter future for the critically endangered black rhino for more than a decade. BRREP works to relocate rhinos and provide equipment and training to rangers to monitor, manage, and protect rhino populations.

    black rhino calf in tall grass
  • Bipartisan Senate legislation gets tough on wildlife crime

    September 16, 2016

    Among the measures included in the END Wildlife Trafficking Act are measures that will ensure federal agencies continue to use a coordinated, whole-of-government approach as they respond to the global poaching crisis and direct them to work with affected countries to improve their abilities to protect wildlife populations, disrupt wildlife trafficking networks and prosecute wildlife criminals.

    African elephant at dusk
  • Global momentum in elephant conservation

    June 20, 2016

    Elephants have been hit hard by a global poaching epidemic that’s emptying the planet of an array of wildlife. As many as 30,000 elephants are killed for their ivory each year. But people and governments are taking a stand for these remarkable animals – and making a tremendous impact.

    elephants at watering hole, Namibia
  • Rampant poaching threatens former elephant stronghold in Tanzania

    June 15, 2016

    Rampant ivory poaching has reduced the elephant population in Tanzania’s oldest and largest protected area by 90 percent in fewer than 40 years. WWF is sounding the alarm for urgent action in combating wildlife crime in the reserve.

    an elephant in Selous reserve
  • New US ivory regulations mark a victory in the fight to save elephants

    June 02, 2016

    Setting an example for the world in the fight to save elephants, the United States has finalized new regulations that will help shut down commercial elephant ivory trade within its borders and stop wildlife crime overseas.

    African elephant
  • Celebrating an amazing two years of zero rhino poaching in Nepal

    May 02, 2016

    Nepal marked two consecutive years since its last rhino was poached on May 2, 2014. This exceptional success is a result of a combination of high-level political will and government entities, and the active involvement of conservation communities.

    rhino in grass
  • What is ivory and why does it belong on elephants?

    We’ve all seen photographs of majestic elephants sporting long, off-white tusks on either side of their trunks. This ivory is both beautiful on the animals and essential to the species’ survival. But what exactly is it?

    elephant standing in field
  • Night vision: how WWF helped rangers illuminate the darkness

    April 26, 2016

    WWF designed and installed a camera and software system smart enough to both distinguish human movement from that of animals and to alert rangers of the presence of poachers. What does this mean for conservation?

    setting up the camera
  • WWF develops a new technology to stop poachers in their tracks

    WWF designed and installed a remarkable new thermal and infrared camera and software system that can identify poachers from afar and alert park rangers of their presence.

    Mike Feldman, electronic security technician for Unilux installing solar panels for FLIR camera system in a National Park in central Kenya.
  • New US regulations around captive tigers could provide a boost for wild tigers

    April 05, 2016

    Tiger populations fighting for a comeback in the wild will receive a much needed lifeline from the United States government. Improved and tightened regulations around captive tigers will make it more difficult for captive-bred tigers to filter into and stimulate the illegal wildlife trade that threatens wild tigers in Asia.

    Tigers
  • For the first time in 100 years, tiger numbers are growing

    April 10, 2016

    After a century of constant decline, the number of wild tigers is on the rise! According to the most recent data, at least 3,890 tigers now exist in the wild—up from an estimated 3,200 in 2010.

    tiger in grass
  • Jared Leto and WWF raise awareness on wildlife crime

    Leto, a WWF Global Ambassador, spoke out against wildlife crime as part of a World Wildlife Day event on March 3, co-hosted by WWF President and CEO Carter Roberts. The event brought together local supporters, partners and influencers to raise awareness and support for combatting the poaching crisis.

    Jared Leto giving remarks
  • Why we care about elephants on World Wildlife Day—and every day

    March 03, 2016

    Elephants number among the smartest and most empathetic creatures on the planet. This World Wildlife Day, we’re celebrating these magnificent animals—and emphasizing their need for our help.

    BORNEO_Christy_Williams_WWF_113471.jpg
  • Major ivory trafficking network broken up in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    February 11, 2016

    In a significant blow to the illegal ivory trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), authorities dismantled a major ivory trafficking syndicate thanks to a law enforcement supported by WWF and partners.

    Guard with hand held GPS device for recording gorilla locations

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