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Madagascar Safaris

Small-group expeditions to see Madagascar's reptiles, birds and, of course, lemurs.

  • Mantadia National Park is the best place in the world to see diademed siafakas.

  • A panther chameleon, like ones you may see on your Madagascar Adventure, can catch prey with its tongue in 20-thousandths of a second.

  • Mantadia National Park contains a thousand different orchid species.

  • Lemur Island is a small island sanctuary home to orphaned lemurs that are at ease around human visitors.

Even the best-traveled nature lover will make a kaleidoscope of discoveries in Madagascar—upwards of 80 percent of the island's plants and animals exist nowhere else on Earth. And between 1999 and 2010, scientists discovered more than 615 new species on the island.

Available Tours

lemur

Madagascar Wildlife Adventure
Explore four of Madagascar’s national parks in search of its iconic wildlife. Search for multiple species of lemurs—including the loud indri indri and the palm-sized brown mouse lemur—as well as brightly colored chameleons and rare bird species.
14-day tours from $10,495



Available Extensions

Cape Town Extension 4 days, custom pricing

Articles

Endangered and Endemic: The Fragile Wonders of Madagascar
Video of the Week: The Wondrous Wildlife of Madagascar
Top Shot: Madagascar
Q-and-A: Madagascar with WWF's Lisa Steel
Eleven Leaping Lemur Facts
Top Shots: Luck or Skill?
Ten Things to Take on Your African Safari
Women in Conservation: Rachel Kramer
Spotlight on Sustainability: The Importance of Ecotourism

WWF & Natural Habitat Adventures
Call (888) 993 – 8687 to book your spot on this tour. Questions? Email us at travel@wwfus.org.

WWF in Madagascar
WWF has been active in Madagascar for more than three decades. Our projects include helping communities manage their natural resources and working closely with the government to create new protected areas. Read more here.

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