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World Wildlife Fund On Balance

filtered by category: Consumption

  • Date: 03 March 2016
  • Author: Simon Billing, Forum for the Future

This week Forum for the Future launches The Protein Challenge 2040. It is the culmination of a year of enquiry by a really unusual coalition of food companies, retailers, feed companies and NGOs into what we like to call the big protein question: How are we going to feed 9 billion people enough protein by 2040, in a way that is healthy, affordable and good for the environment?

It’s a tough question, and one that we have grappled with together over long hours reviewing past research and evidence, meetings and discussions – both in the office and over the dinner table at home.

Having worked with 200 stakeholders across the protein system and read countless research reports, it was clear that our future food security is an issue that people are very passionate about. It was also clear that polarized discussions were getting in the way of progress. Different types of protein sources were labelled ‘"good’" or "bad", effectively preventing people from finding a common way forward.

Through these conversations, we discovered organizations that were working toward more sustainable protein in different ways. Some were exploring sustainable nutrition, others were investigating which future protein sources to get behind. Realizing the complexity of the issues and the number of different protein sources – not just animal to plant, these organizations saw the benefits of joining forces for the first time – hence the formation of The Protein Challenge 2040.

During the past year, we’ve worked hard to map the entire protein system, something that has never been done before. The issues within the system are very complex:

Balancing access to good nutrition with sustainable production

Some nutritionists we spoke to were perplexed. Protein is essential for human health, but why were some people labelling it "bad"? There are great inequalities of access, with some of us eating more than sufficient protein, with others facing a serious lack, and both sets of circumstances are associated with major health risks. And, not all sources of protein are the same in terms of how much nutrition they provide and how much impact their production has on the environment. Some sources of protein are resource-intensive and have many environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, heavy water consumption and habitat destruction.

Complex interrelationships

The protein system comprises the animal, plant and alternative protein industries and all their value chains are very deeply linked. Over 50% of good quality plant protein grown is fed to animals and a good proportion of wild-caught fish is fed to farm animals and fish. The protein system is over-dependent on soy for animal feed, and the cultivation of soy in turn drives deforestation. So it’s not simply enough to find more sustainable ways of growing a crop, it’s also about finding alternatives and tackling demand.

Changing diets

As we struggle to feed 9 billion demand for protein will only grow, and much of the demand will be for animal protein. So we do need to address consumer diets and consumption, as well as looking at the diets of those animals themselves. And, as any retailer can tell you, trying to influence consumer behavior is never easy!

The Protein Challenge 2040 steering group comprises some visionary companies that recognize this complexity and the challenges ahead. With Forum as independent facilitators of the coalition, the group worked to identify the solutions that the protein system can take collective action on now, in order to catalyze the greatest change and shift the system onto a more sustainable path.

Using future scenarios to test the system in different possible worlds and working with over 200 experts and innovators in London, New York, Rotterdam and San Francisco, we have identified six areas for innovation and action. We agree that we do need to have a better balance of proteins from plants rather than animal sources and we do need to scale game-changing alternatives to animal feed, as well as tackling the loss of protein-rich waste across the system. Most importantly, we recognize the world needs to focus on protein, now.

This isn’t a report on problems in the food system. It is an invitation for you to join us in transforming the future of protein together. If you have the expertise, knowledge and resources to drive forward the solutions in these areas, we want to hear from you. We’re beginning a new journey together looking for other businesses, entrepreneurs and experts who will help us go further and faster. Does that sound like you?

Editor's Note:

WWF is proud to be a part of Forum for the Future’s Protein Challenge. All of the issues it’s tackling are critical, and WWF-US will work with the Forum particularly closely on scaling up sustainable feed innovation. Because they require energy and nutrients just for the maintenance of their lives, food animals require more natural resources than plants to produce food for us. As the global population grows and, with it, demand for protein, we have to find ways to produce and use animal feed more efficiently, and to use nutrients that animals can convert into edible protein but otherwise go to waste today. Nothing less than our climate, the health of our forests, grasslands, and oceans, and the diversity of life on Earth are at stake.

Carlos Saviani, Vice President, Sustainable Food, World Wildlife Fund

 

  • Date: 16 February 2016

The following is an exerpt from KPMG's recent report, Unlocking the Power of Partnership. Read the full case study by downloading the report.

Identifying shared Value

For more than 40 years, society’s demand on natural resources has surpassed what our planet can replenish. These demands include resources consumed for food, fuel and fiber, land on which we build, and forests that filter our air. A growing population and rising middle class will only exacerbate these pressures, unless we recognize that our continued prosperity depends on the natural resources sustained by a healthy planet. 

Business is increasingly realizing that they are not immune to these pressures. The supply chains of large companies depend on natural resources from all around the world. Natural resource management is more and more tied to operational and reputational risk, and ultimately, to the long-term viability of a company. Corporations therefore have a business interest in understanding how their products and the raw materials used in global operations are impacting local communities, biodiversity, and the environment. While there is a clear imperative to take action, business cannot tackle these risks alone.

NGOs are uniquely qualified to build cross-sector partnerships that address complex challenges affecting both global and local stakeholders. NGOs are consistently ranked as the most trusted type of institution by t he Edelman Trust Barometer, an annual survey measuring stakeholder perceptions across 27 markets worldwide. In addition to bringing a foundation of trust to cross-sector partnerships, international NGOs leverage their global networks, technical credibility, and convening power to collaborate with companies in ways that meet the needs of people and nature.

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  • Date: 05 August 2015

The green Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) logo on a product means the most responsible forest management practices were used to make the product. Smaller trees were not harmed when harvesting larger trees, the rights of people living in or near the forest were respected, wildlife habitat was not degraded, and more.

Many forest operators know this or are learning about it. That’s huge progress. But taking action to get the FSC certification is another story. Often, they think the cost of FSC will have a negative impact on their bottom line.

A WWF study published today dispels this belief.

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  • Date: 23 October 2014

We recently sat down with Bob Langert, McDonald's vice president of sustainability, to learn more about how environmental stewardship is playing a part in the company's decision making.

 

Bob Langert, vice president of sustainability, McDonald's

What does sustainability mean to McDonald’s?

For McDonald’s, sustainability is all about creating shared value – for our business and the world in which we operate. We truly believe that we can grow our business by making a positive difference.

We now have a bold 2020 Framework that is guiding our work, centered on Five Pillars: Food, Sourcing, People, Community and Planet. We’ve developed measurable, forward-looking goals in areas like energy efficiency that prove the linkage between good business and good sustainability. For example, we are aiming to reduce our energy usage in company-owned restaurants by 20% by 2020. It is our #1 environmental impact for both company-owned and franchised restaurant operations, reducing our carbon footprint and our annual energy bill, estimated at over $2 billion.

Sustainability also means living Our Values every day, and making decisions based on these values. Doing the right thing has, and always will be a critical part of who we are as a company.

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  • Date: 26 June 2013
  • Author: Nick Conger

The world has never seen economic growth at a rate currently happening in China. Having surpassed Japan in 2011, it’s quickly become the world’s second largest economy and its GDP continues to expand (though ebbing in recent years).

I’m just back from a 10-day visit to China and can attest to this growth. Industrial cranes fill the skylines from Beijing to Dalian to Wuhan, construction vehicles clog traffic patterns, pollution billows into the air. So much that China is responsible for a quarter of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

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  • Date: 09 May 2013
  • Author: Nick Conger

We’ve all heard stories about the foolish rich guy who blew his fortune on outlandish cars, homes and yachts. They usually follow a predictable path: He experiences a windfall of cash, spends beyond his means and inevitably plummets into bankruptcy.

This story is being played out on the biggest stage of all: Planet Earth. On the whole, humanity is currently on a natural resource spending binge. At the same time, more than a billion people go to bed hungry every night. Until we balance these inequities, we’ll all suffer the consequences – from the price we pay for food to access to clean water.

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  • Date: 02 May 2013
  • Author: Nick Conger

Maybe it’s all the recent droughts, or severe storms, or basic supply/demand dynamics, but there's a lot of buzz about water risk these days. Alexis Morgan, a global water expert at WWF, is most concerned with the latter issue. Alexis and executives from PepsiCo and Calvert take to the “Wet & Wild: Assessing & Managing Agricultural Water Risks” panel session at today’s Ceres Conference, where they’ll discuss strategies to bring water use back into balance with nature.

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  • Date: 24 April 2013
  • Author: Nick Conger

Being green in our material world can be exhasuting. Our global economic engine runs on consumer spending. But the more we spend, the more we consume, the more our planet struggles to sustain itself. If we continue gobbling up resources at the current rate, by 2030 we will need the equivalent of two planets to maintain life as we know it.

Reconciling this conundrum may seem impossible. But fear not my material friends, balance can be achieved.

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  • Date: 04 April 2013
  • Author: Nick Conger

Forget what you know about corporate sustainability. It’s probably all wrong.

Gone are the days of PR spin and shallow words. The new sustainability is about strategic management of natural resources, which are increasingly hard to come by. It has evolved from a reputational strategy to a business imperative. Don’t take my word for it; take the word of the biggest companies in the world.

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