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World Wildlife Fund On Balance

filtered by category: Freshwater

  • Date: 19 May 2017
  • Author: Greg Koch, Senior Director, Global Water Stewardship, The Coca-Cola Company

Water is a finite resource—Earth has a fixed amount—but it is infinitely renewable. Since all water is renewed through natural processes, it means we—people, nature, business, farmers, and governments—always have and always will share the same water.

That level of sharing, through the continuous cycle of water, is global, and probably doesn’t feel personal to anyone.  But sharing water also happens at the local level, everywhere, and this should be personal.

On June 5, we will co-host a conference, Sharing Water, with our partner World Wildlife Fund (WWF), along with the World Water Council (WWC).  The event presents an opportunity to play a role in WWC’s official, regional process for North America in preparation for 8th World Water Forum—the world’s largest meeting on water, or as some refer to it: the “Olympics of water.”  Discussions and output from the convening will be documented and provided to the organizers of the 8th Forum to help set the agenda and potentially contribute to its outcomes.

Our regional event will focus on a subset of themes for the 8th Forum, water and: development, finance, people, and ecosystems.  Most important is the over-arching theme of sharing water, which is a powerful one.

Everyone and everything requires water in a given time and place, whether it’s at home to bathe your children, outdoors for recreational fun, in hand to quench your thirst, or on a farm to grow the food you consume. How much water you use and what you do to affect its quality matters to everyone in your community sharing the same water resource.

When you think of sharing water it can become easier to understand that we all need to be a part of paying for water infrastructure (financing), helping keep it clean (people), and conserving watersheds (ecosystems).

This concept drives our water stewardship program at Coca-Cola. Our business is mainly producing beverages and selling them to adjacent communities. So while we are certainly focused on sustainable use of water in our plants, being efficient, and making sure the water we discharge is clean, we also step out of our bottling plants to work with governments, communities, civil society, and even our competitors to help protect nature and address health issues through safe water access.  We not only share the water, but also the responsibility of helping to protect and conserve it.

Our hope for the June 5 event is to build on this theme and help guide future discussions toward more collaborative solutions for water issues.  We all need water and can’t look to any one actor to solve its challenges.  Yes, it will take government, civil society, farmers, and industry, but it also takes you and me.

  • Date: 17 November 2016

During World Water Week in Stockholm on Sept. 1, 2016, WWF’s Lindsay Bass, The Coca-Cola Company’s Greg Koch and LimnoTech’s Paul Freedman took a seat to participate in a recorded SIWI Sofa session, “Balancing Act: What Now for Corporate Water Goals?”

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  • Date: 25 August 2016

WWF and The Coca-Cola Company have been working together since 2007 to help conserve the world’s freshwater resources. We’ve made great strides in 2015 to help ensure healthy, resilient freshwater basins in our focal areas of the Mesoamerican Reef catchments in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras, and the Yangtze River in China.

Learn more about our progress in measurably improving environmental performance across Coca-Cola’s supply chain, integrating the value of nature into decision-making processes, and convening influential partners to solve global environmental challenges.

A Transformative Partnership to Conserve Water: Annual Report 2015

  • Date: 10 April 2015
  • Author: Karin Krchnak, WWF; Greg Koch, The Coca-Cola Company

As we gather our schedule, briefing documents and lots of business cards to head to Korea for the 7th World Water Forum, we’ve also been gathering our thoughts—on what we hope to learn, see and achieve at the event. What can we learn from other cross-sector partnerships? Will we find new partners to work with us on solutions to global water challenges? How can we positively contribute to the dialogue?

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  • Date: 24 March 2015
  • Author: Sarah Davidson and Lindsay Bass

WWF, WaterAid, and a host of companies and organizations today issued an open letter in support of the dedicated water and sanitation goal currently proposed as part of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development framework. This is an issue that we, personally, and WWF as an organization care deeply about.

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  • Date: 22 March 2015
  • Author: Imakando Sinyama, WWF Zambia

WWF and Sedex released a brief for World Water Day examining corporate water risks, and of the many important take-aways, the one that sticks with me most is this: Even if a business is highly water efficient or uses a relatively small amount of water, they may still be at risk.

This is counter-intuitive in the extreme, and clearly it is a message that hasn’t sunk in with most suppliers. To help get your head around this, let’s take a look at a very specific example: the Kafue Flats.

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  • Date: 21 November 2014
  • Author: Greg Koch, Director, Global Water Stewardship, The Coca-Cola Company

Greg Koch, The Coca-Cola Company

I did the unthinkable in London on Nov. 6; I spent a sunny, blue-sky day indoors. Cloudy, rainy weather seems to follow me whenever I get the chance to visit this great city, so it was tempting to stay outdoors.

No such luck and I was glad I didn’t.

I spent the day in the revitalized London Docklands at The Economist’s World Water Summit. The day was jam packed with impressive speakers, panel discussions and networking over tea breaks. Many of the leading voices and actors in the water space were present. Governments, development organizations, academia, civil society and industry were all well-represented. Importantly, there was also a wide geographic representation with participants from every continent (OK, not Antarctica but I did meet two people who had been there!).

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  • Date: 29 July 2014
  • Author: Karin Krchnak, WWF

Today, as part of the White House’s Climate Data Initiative, the United Nations-supported Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) Initiative released the “Investor Guidance Document: Water Risks in Agricultural Supply Chains” to educate and engage potentially at-risk companies on the impacts water scarcity could have on their supply chains. With over 1260 signatories, the PRI initiative represents over $45 trillion USD in management assets, including water intensive commodities like cotton, sugar and corn.

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  • Date: 09 July 2014

Celebrating an Anniversary with Progress for the Planet

 

One year ago, WWF renewed our partnership with The Coca-Cola Company through 2020. We expanded our collaboration to more deeply engage across the Company’s value chain; involve additional partners to achieve greater scale and impact; and spark commitments from businesses, governments, and consumers to take action to value, conserve, and protect the planet’s natural resources, with a focus on fresh water. Together, we are trying to address the natural resource challenges that impact fresh water.

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  • Date: 14 May 2014

As part of the regional planning process of the 7th World Water Forum, World Wildlife Fund and The Coca-Cola Company are hosting Water for Our Future—an event convening influential voices from government, civil society and business to explore issues and solutions to the world’s water challenges. Through collective action, we hope to achieve greater scale and impact to catalyze action to value, conserve and protect the planet’s fresh water.

Leading up to Water for Our Future, WWF and Coca-Cola will be sharing responses to water-related questions from select event participants to initiate discussion and continue to raise awareness of our global water challenges. For our final installment in the series, we talk to Patrick Cairo of United Water and Dale Jacobson of the World Water Council.

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