World Wildlife Fund Sustainability Works

  • Date: 09 September 2020
  • Author: Sheila Bonini, Senior Vice President, Private Sector Engagement

Over the past ten months, COVID-19 has underscored the ways in which our relationship with nature—in all its forms—is fundamentally broken.

This presents significant risks for business and finance, as they are inextricably linked. Structural issues that have compounded over time can no longer be pushed aside, or left to tackle at a later date. Collectively, we must turn our attention towards the health of our environment, and work to create a “nature-positive” economy.

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  • Date: 21 August 2020
  • Author: Akiva Fishman, Manager, Private Sector Interventions to Tackle Deforestation and Degradation, WWF

Over the last decade, we saw a major increase in the number of corporate commitments to eliminate deforestation from agricultural supply chains. This trend put a spotlight on how the production of soft commodities like food crops, wood fiber, and rubber contributes to deforestation. It also led to important improvements in supply chain transparency.

Nevertheless, agriculture continues to drive forest loss across the world, with enormous implications for sustainable economies, livelihoods, and biodiversity. Companies urgently need to intensify their efforts to improve transparency in their supply chains, work with suppliers to ensure commodities are not causing deforestation, and report on their efforts and progress in line with the Accountability Framework—the best practice guidance for setting and implementing corporate deforestation commitments.

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  • Date: 11 August 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused major ongoing food supply chain disruption. Widespread food business and market closures have led to massive surges in on-farm food loss across a variety of products and commodities; at the same time, there’s a growing number of food insecure people around the world.

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  • Date: 24 July 2020
  • Author: Julia Kurnik, director of innovation startups, WWF Markets Institute

We live in uncertain times. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic threw our lives into chaos, we seemed to be hit daily with dire predictions of what the future could look like if we don’t curb greenhouse gas emissions, if we don’t manage our water resources, if we don’t get our consumption in check.

We tend to focus on potential negative outcomes because we need people to know that the stakes for these issues are very high and very real. But it’s important to take a moment to look at a future where we make the right choices. If we kickstart innovation now, invest now, and get the right people to start working toward this common goal now, here’s what the mid-Mississippi Delta could look like 50 years from today:

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  • Date: 23 July 2020
  • Author: Julia Kurnik, director of innovation startups, WWF Markets Institute

As stated in the previous post, a more distributed and resilient food system won’t happen on its own. To enable a future where American food production puts less strain on the environment, is closer to consumers with less waste, and benefits economically depressed areas, WWF’s Markets Institute is looking out to the future.

In the next three years, we will need to focus on the following:

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  • Date: 22 July 2020
  • Author: Julia Kurnik, director of innovation startups, WWF Markets Institute

The mid-Delta has tremendous potential to grow specialty produce in commercial quantities at competitive prices to secure our food system and revitalize the region. While California will continue to be a key agricultural state, the Markets Institute envisions a more distributed and resilient food system, with more capacity for different regions to grow what is best suited to shifting climates, where food is produced closer to consumers with less waste, and economically depressed areas can benefit from higher-value produce.

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  • Date: 21 July 2020
  • Author: Julia Kurnik, director of innovation startups, WWF Markets Institute

The mid-Delta region has a deep connection to agriculture. The Mississippi River and the smaller Arkansas River have good soil and are transportation corridors. Agriculture has driven the economy in the region since the first European settlers arrived. Sugar and rice dominated the 18th century, and cotton became king in the early 19th century. These row crops remain common, but now wheat, soy, and corn (soy and corn for animal feed) have also become mainstays. Today, 75% of farmland is used to produce row crops, with 25% used for specialty crops.

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  • Date: 20 July 2020
  • Author: Julia Kurnik, director of innovation startups, WWF Markets Institute

California dominates farming of specialty produce in the US today, growing half our vegetables and more than 2/3 of our fruits and nuts. Yet this is becoming increasingly unsustainable. Water is becoming scarcer, fires are common, and increasing temperatures are threatening some crops’ ability to fruit properly. The critical task of growing our nation’s food will need to adapt and shift, but without proper planning it might promote extensive land conversion, which is harmful to the environment, and ignore or worsen racial and social inequities. The US is not alone in facing this challenge. Countries across the world have their own “California” but no one is looking for the next one.

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  • Date: 17 July 2020

As our society faces many uncertainties, one thing has never been more clear – investing in the health of our planet provides a foundation to build resilient communities for both people and nature. Many companies are at the forefront of driving innovation and developing strategies that help our global community tackle challenges, including climate change. For years most sustainability strategies existed within a company’s four walls, but as we settle into a new decade, companies are starting to embrace nature-based solutions to deliver impactful results that help propel us toward a carbon neutral future.

Recently, P&G announced a new project with WWF to advance restoration in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, which is part of a larger commitment for its operations to be carbon neutral for the next decade. To better understand what these investments in nature really mean, we asked WWF’s Sheila Bonini, senior vice president for private sector engagement, and Kerry Cesareo, senior vice president for forests, to help break it down:

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  • Date: 14 July 2020

Business is a critical lever for driving the shifts we need to fix the broken plastic system. WWF’s Bioplastic Feedstock Alliance (BFA) addresses a key piece of this puzzle, the shift towards the responsible sourcing of plant-based plastics, known as bioplastics. To match the scope and scale of this complex task, BFA is structured as a multi-stakeholder forum for knowledge sharing, collaboration, and science-based thought leadership to advance our understanding of bioplastic in a circular economy.

Today, BFA welcomes Kimberly-Clark as the newest member of this ambitious consortium.

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