• Electronic monitoring for transparency in Ghana’s tuna fleet

    Addressing the issue of overfishing in international waters requires a complete understanding of who is fishing, what they’re fishing, and where they’re catching it. Electronic monitoring is a cost-effective way to improve the transparency of fishing activities.

    close-up of camera used to monitor vessels
  • Accelerating Tuna Sustainability through the Global FIP Alliance for Sustainable Tuna (G-FAST)

    Tuna are among the world’s more commercially valuable fish; strong global demand and excess of fishing fleets will likely cause stocks to decline if management strategies are not improved.

    empty fishing net
  • Reducing IUU Risk in Russia King Crab Fishery

    In a recent case study focused on Russia’s king crab fishery, WWF worked with Orca Bay Foods, LLC to demonstrate that the application of some basic tools can substantially reduce the risk of "IUU infection" even in a relatively complex and multi-national supply chain.

    Cover for Case Study on Russian King Crab Sourcing and Traceability Pilot Report
  • Bringing fisheries forward

    WWF has been working to reduce IUU fishing for years and recognizes the necessity of widespread utilization of relevant technology throughout the fishing sector as one part of the solution.

    200 fishing boats were grounded because of IUU, company's license suspended. New minister of marine affairs and fisheries - Susi Pudjastuti - taking more hardine approach to fisheries law enforcement, Indonesia.
  • Pakistan’s tuna fleets lead efforts to untangle our oceans

    As part of the Common Oceans ABNJ Tuna Project, WWF is working onboard with vessel crews to improve scientific reporting and adjust gillnetting practices to monitor and reduce bycatch. This project demonstrated that vessel crews—uniquely positioned at the beginning of the supply chain—can be effective agents to develop best practice improvements and successfully implement them broadly.

    Gill net fisher on water