Forest Habitat Stories

  • Deforestation fronts

    January 13, 2021

    A new WWF report on global forest cover and forest loss finds that over 160,000 square miles, an area roughly the size of California, were lost in deforestation hot spots around the world between 2004 and 2017. Deforestation puts human health and the health of our planet at risk. 

     Deforestation aerial photo of lush green forest on the left and bare brown dirt next to it on the right
  • What are nature-based solutions and how can they help us address the climate crisis?

    November 10, 2020

    Tackling the climate crisis will be one of the biggest challenges of our time, and nature itself can contribute to the fight. 

    Stormy sunrise over the Badlands
  • A hilltop coffee plantation benefits from robust and healthy forests

    November 03, 2020

    On a hilltop in southeast Brazil, 4,500 feet above the surrounding landscape, is a coffee plantation that has been operating in the same family for more than 150 years—five generations. Owner Ellen Fontana is restoring additional forest habitat on her property, connecting the span of natural forest on her land to another forest fragment on a neighboring property.

    An aerial view of a lush, green coffee farm on a sunny day
  • Investing in "Thirty Hills"

    October 27, 2020

    Thirty Hills is the last large block of intact, lowland forest still standing in central Sumatra. After five years of successful forest conservation, we celebrate five major wins within this critically important landscape.

    The Bukit Tigapuluh, or “Thirty Hills,” landscape is one of the last great stands of rain forest in the deforestation hotspot that is the Indonesian island of Sumatra
  • A sign of hope

    October 15, 2020

    Critically endangered Malayan tiger cubs spotted in the wild give hope that the species could be on the road to recovery.

    Black and white image of two Malayan tigers walking through their forest home at night
  • Monitoring jaguars to help ensure their long-term survival

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    In 2017, WWF-Peru began monitoring jaguars in the Napo-Putumayo Corridor to gain crucial insights that could help protect the species longterm.
    Jaguar walking close to camera
  • Dzanga-Sangha gorilla twins turn four

    October 06, 2020

    The first-ever twins born to habituated gorillas in the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Area are now four years old.  Gorilla twins are extremely rare, but the survival of Inguka and Inganda brings hope that it is possible for other gorilla twins to survive in the future.

    two western lowland gorillas sitting on the ground in the forest both look over their shoulders at the camera
  • Scientists record 110 new species in Greater Mekong

    August 25, 2020

    A new WWF report details a vibrant diversity of plants and vertebrate animals in Southeast Asia that have never been scientifically identified.

    A close up of a lizard's face.
  • Elephant collaring – protecting the giants of Sabah

    August 12, 2020

    The Elephant Conservation Unit of WWF-Malaysia uses collaring to learn more about the elephants in Sabah. The information they collect from these collars helps the conservationists better protect the elephants and develop strategies to reduce instances of human wildlife conflict. 

    Two elephants emerge from a palm oil plantation
  • 3 billion animals harmed by Australia’s fires

    July 28, 2020

    Australia’s bushfire crisis was one of the worst wildlife disasters in modern history. New WWF research reveals that the toll on wildlife was around three times higher than an earlier study estimated.

    Echidna walks amongst burnt bushland
  • Healing forests

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    As the world reels from the COVID-19 pandemic, WWF is working with global health company Johnson & Johnson to understand the underlying links between disease and deforestation.
    Landscape of forest canopy from above
  • In the Congo Basin, forests get a boost from an unlikely source

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    Acoustic guitars are often made from wood species susceptible to overharvesting and climate change. In the Congo Basin, Taylor Guitars is providing a hopeful model for restoring vulnerable tonewoods.
    Front of acoustic guitar
  • Standing Tall

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    Kerry Cesareo, WWF-US senior vice president for forests, on WWF's solutions to protect and restore the world's forests—and to address climate change.
    Looking up at the canopy and sky from the base of a Sequoia tree in Calaveras Big Trees State Park, California
  • Safe Zone

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    In the heart of the Central African Republic, Dzanga-Sangha stands as a model for stability and peace—and a safe place for elephants and gorillas to roam.
    Ba’Aka elders facing camera
  • World on fire

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    As flames engulfed parts of the world last year, WWF sent emergency support to help local firefighters and communities in need.
    Landscape with dark smoke filling sky
  • A reptile rescue yields a dynamic shot

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    Snakes are notoriously difficult to photograph. But in the forests of Ecuador, one photographer had a rare chance to capture a brown vine snake.
    Vine snake wrapped around tree
  • Gallery: Photographs by Beth Moon

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    With her photography, Beth Moon develops awe-inspiring portraits of trees in landscapes around the globe.
    Road passing between baobab trees
  • WWF's Josefina Braña Varela on the importance of protecting our forests

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    As vice president and deputy lead for forests, Josefina Braña Varela leads WWF's work to halt deforestation and forest degradation around the world.
    Josefina Braña Varela seated on stage
  • A new reserve keeps a Russian forest intact

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    Thanks to 17 years of advocacy work by WWF, one of the last expanses of intact forest in Europe will be safeguarded into the future.
    Boats in Dvina-Pinega Landscape Reserve
  • Returning the Atlantic Forest to its wild roots

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    In an ambitious undertaking, WWF and International Paper (IP) are working alongside a local nursery to help restore parts of Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, which has faced of years of deforestation.
    Santos planting seedlings
  • Ongoing efforts to safeguard Australia’s native species

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    Eucalyptus forests make up a large portion of Australia’s total forest area. But the 2019–20 bushfire season was catastrophic for many of these forests—and the wildlife that lives in them.
    Trees in a eucalyptus forest
  • Cockatoo chicks discovered after fires ravage Kangaroo Island

    July 08, 2020

    Six months ago, bushfires ravaged Kangaroo Island. The endangered glossy black cockatoo was pushed to the brink of extinction. But chicks were recently discovered amid burnt bushland, boosting hopes that the species can be saved.

    A pair of Kangaroo Island glossy black-cockatoos in unburnt habitat
  • The snaring crisis in Southeast Asia

    July 01, 2020

    Illegal snaring is a rampant threat to wildlife and people in the forests of Southeast Asia. Snares are used to capture animals for the illegal wildlife trade. WWF-supported ranger patrols are working to address this crisis by removing snares. 

    Confiscated snares and traps in Cambodia.
  • In the Colombian Amazon, a forest explorer catalogs a community’s resources

    Marisela Silva Parra, 41, is the only female member of a WWF-supported group of local farmers and community leaders who are helping their community realize the value of its natural resources. The group calls themselves Los Exploradores—The Explorers.

    Portrait of Marisela Silva Parra standing in the forest with a clipboard