Sustainable Seafood Stories

  • It's time to stop funding overfishing

    November 12, 2020

    Harmful fisheries subsidies fuel harmful fishing practices. Rather than subsidizing fishing activities that hurt the ocean, communities, and the economy, governments have an opportunity to reroute funding toward efforts that bring benefits to marine health and human well-being.

    Gill net fisher on water
  • 3 tools to promote sustainable fishing and end human rights abuses

    September 29, 2020

    Many of the practices that lead to unsustainable fishing are also rooted in some of the same underlying conditions that lead to human rights abuses. Learn more about the tools that WWF is implementing to help address these critical issues. 

    Two men drive out into the ocean in their shrimp fishing boat surrounded by sea birds flying along above them.
  • Do you know what's really on your plate?

    July 23, 2020

    Today, there are over 400 known endangered marine and freshwater species linked to human consumption. Being mindful of what species are at risk in the marine and freshwater environments can help you protect these animals from disappearing for good and enjoy your seafood responsibly.

    Bluefin tuna sushi sitting on a plate
  • 5 ways harmful fisheries subsidies impact coastal communities

    November 21, 2019

    Our planet’s health—and our own well-being—is dependent on a vibrant ocean rich with nature, like fish! While sustainable fishing can be an effective way to keep our oceans healthy, one big barrier is standing in the way: taxpayer-funded support for unsustainable fishing operations.

    Fishermen on artisanal fishing boats, out at sea, Tema, Ghana.
  • Seaweed is a win for you, the ocean, and the planet

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Seaweed is highly nutritious, easy to grow, and beneficial to ocean ecosystems. Learn more about how this hardy, resilient macro algae is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity.
    Kelp farm
  • Sustainable shrimp?

    November 14, 2018

    Titi shrimp, or pomada, are wild shrimp, native to Ecuador, and they are harvested around the Gulf of Guayaquil by both trawlers and artisanal fishermen using a unique kind of trap that doesn’t exist anywhere else in the world. WWF-Ecuador has been working with both the industrial and artisanal fishermen to ensure that the fishery is sustainable.

    shrimp Antonio Busiello WW290773
  • In Mozambique, banning fishing leads to a bigger catch

    Pulizica, a small fishing community in Mozambique’s Primeiras e Segundas archipelago, is home to the newest fish sanctuary established by the CARE-WWF Alliance, a global partnership to address the root causes of poverty and environmental degradation. How well is the protected area recovering declining fish stocks in the region?

    Fisherman gathers seine nets from the water on the Ilha de Mafamede, Mozambique. Mafamede is one of the protected islands that comprise Primeiras e Segundas.
  • Congratulations, Bahamas! We Did It!

    August 07, 2018

    The Bahamas’ lobster fishers just earned certification from the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) for managing their fishery sustainably. The MSC certification helps ensure that the fishery can continue to produce food and jobs for current and future generations.

    fisherman and lobster Mac Stone WW1103815
  • From ocean to plate

    June 06, 2018

    About 35% of harvested fish and seafood is either lost or wasted along the supply chain. So where does this loss happen and what can you do to help?

    barracuda Cat Holloway WW172318
  • Love lobster tails? Thank The Bahamas’ Mia Isaacs

    As president of the Bahamas Marine Exporters Association and managing director of Heritage Seafood, a leading lobster processor, Mia is working with her fellow exporters, fishermen, the Bahamian government, and international NGOs like WWF and The Nature Conservancy to ensure lobsters are fished sustainably. 

    Spiny Lobster
  • Oceans X Labs: Kickstarting conservation tech entrepreneurship

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2017
    Launched in 2015, Oceans X Labs is a joint initiative of WWF and Conservation X Labs that, drawing on the venture tech model, aims to support and encourage innovators as they develop new approaches to addressing some of the ocean’s biggest problems.
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  • Looking Up

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2016
    Spanish Wells, a port that's a two-hour ferry ride from Nassau, is the kind of town where news is both rare and fast-traveling. Here, the arrival of a fishing boat qualifies as an event.
    Spiny Lobster
  • WWF’s Vishwanie Maharaj on the power of incentives to drive conservation

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2016
    I grew up in Trinidad and Tobago, where you can’t escape the ocean—and you wouldn’t want to.
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  • Working together to protect a fishery in The Bahamas

    July 17, 2016

    By all accounts, Glenn Pritchard and Mia Isaacs should be rivals. They each own a seafood processing plant and exporting company in The Bahamas, and both stake a claim to the lucrative spiny lobster business. But one unmatched necessity brings these two competitors together without a second thought: a healthy and robust lobster population in Bahamian waters.

    Diver holding lobsters in ocean.
  • What's a river worth?

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    In Colombia’s portion of the Orinoco river basin, a cross section of society converges to assess a river’s health
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  • A Salmon Scientist on Protecting Streams

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2015
    Dr. Carol Ann Woody captures a tiny salmon as part of a comprehensive study of Alaska’s fish species.
  • Are We Buying the Fish We Think We’re Buying?

    October 14, 2015

    WWF is urging the US government to establish regulations, including the proposal of a national traceability program to track seafood from the point where it is caught to its entry into the US, under which all species of fish are eventually covered.

    fishermen on a boat
  • Conserving the Future of Mahi Mahi in Peru

    June 08, 2015

    WWF's Alison Cross reflects on her experience visiting Peru's only mahi mahi fishery. Fishers and their families rely on abundant fish stocks for their livelihoods. The fishers of Pucusana, government officials and others had finally recognized both the economic and environmental value of selling a sustainably sourced fish, with the long-term goal of achieving certification from the Marine Stewardship Council, an organization that recognizes sustainable fishing practices.

    pucusana fisherman
  • Effects of Overfishing

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2014
    Who's been talking about illegal fishing?
  • A Struggle Against Illegal Fishing

    October 27, 2014

    Antonio Bustos’ family has been fishing Chile’s coastal waters for more than four generations. Artisanal fishers like him used to be able to earn a good living, but increased competition for dwindling fish stocks have made it harder to stay afloat. Some have decided to ignore the quotas that are meant to let fish populations rebound.

     busta on boat
  • Better Practices: A Market Transformed

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2014
    Sparks fly when a speech ignites salmon CEOs
    Salmon
  • Rethinking Food

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2014
    Today one of the biggest threats to our planet comes from the production of food.
    Honey comb with a bee
  • Infinite Depths

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2014
    Protecting oceans and a global seafood pipeline
    Fish in net hauled up from water