Community Development and Indigenous Rights Stories

  • Natural Allies

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    Indigenous peoples and local communities play a crucial role in protecting biodiversity and keeping forests intact.
    Women walking through forest
  • COVID & the Ba’Aka Tribe of Dzanga-Sangha

    August 06, 2020

    In the Central African Republic, WWF supports the Indigenous Ba’Aka tribe of Dzanga-Sangha in social distancing to protect themselves from COVID-19. 

    A group of Ba'Aka people walking into the forest
  • Safe Zone

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    In the heart of the Central African Republic, Dzanga-Sangha stands as a model for stability and peace—and a safe place for elephants and gorillas to roam.
    Ba’Aka elders facing camera
  • WWF's Josefina Braña Varela on the importance of protecting our forests

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2020
    As vice president and deputy lead for forests, Josefina Braña Varela leads WWF's work to halt deforestation and forest degradation around the world.
    Josefina Braña Varela seated on stage
  • The first rule of gorilla tracking? Listen well

    May 05, 2020

    Twenty years ago, a gorilla habitation program provided the Ba’Aka living near the Dzanga Sanga Park with a new opportunity. And by 2020, Dzanga-Sangha employed more than 50 Ba’Aka as gorilla trackers.

    Ossolo Dacko, a BaAka tracker for the western lowland gorilla habituation program, Dzanga-Sangha Special Reserve, Central African Republic
  • Citizen scientists help conserve Nepal’s tigers from behind the lens

    In Nepal, citizen scientists are working with biologists from WWF to help protect tigers, rhinos, elephants, and other wildlife found in Bardia National Park.

    Sabita Malla (front), tiger expert at WWF Nepal, is installing a camera trap with citizen scientists responsible for monitoring tigers in the Khata Corridor. Most visible citizen scientist here is Chabbi Thara Magar.
  • A discussion on gender, equity, and people’s rights with WWF’s Althea Skinner

    March 04, 2020

    WWF’s lead on socially inclusive conservation, Althea Skinner is one of WWF’s core experts on the intersection between conservation and human rights.

    Althea Skinner
  • With access to fresh water, a school garden grows

    February 04, 2020

    In 2009, principal and teacher Marcia Novakc da Silva decided to join forces to start a community rainwater project, led by the organization Incra and supported by WWF. The work is one of  several projects for the recovery of the springs and water supply in region.

    Student waters plant in school garden
  • Empowering women and families to build healthy communities and a healthy planet

    Meeta is a young mother from India. Back-to-back pregnancies and heavy housework responsibilities took a toll on her health and wellbeing. Noting her declining health, a neighborhood social worker invited Meeta and her husband Ramkishore to participate in a CARE maternal health program that fostered open communication, education and access to family planning information.

    Overshoot
  • Across Mozambique and Tanzania, women show us how to improve communities and protect our planet

    As WWF works with communities around the world to preserve habitats, wildlife, and natural resources, we know that it is critical to engage both women and men for the best results—environmentally, socially, and economically.

    A group of women and children from the Sicubir community, Angoche, Mozambique
  • Cultivating sustainable livelihoods and environmental resiliency in Mozambique

    In Mozambique’s Primeiras e Segundas region, villagers are taking part in a savings and loan association that’s revolutionizing how they manage their financial and natural resources.

    Woman in Mangrove James Morgan WW146954
  • Saving a beloved home along the Luangwa River in Zambia

    June 21, 2018

    The Luangwa River is one of the longest remaining free-flowing rivers in Southern Africa. It flows through an area which boasts some of the most pristine habitats left in Zambia for elephants, lions, leopards and a myriad of other wildlife. A dam has been proposed on the Luangwa that would flood almost the entire Luembe chiefdom, destroying habitats and displacing thousands of people.  

    Two women use the river to wash up while avoiding the threat of crocodiles along the Luangwa River.
  • President's Letter: Sizing up conservation

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    WWF President and CEO Carter Roberts on working with communities to create highly local solutions to multiple environmental challenges.
    Carter Roberts
  • Life in Nepal

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2014
    How a tiny, mountainous country became one of the world's biggest conservation successes for wildlife—and for rural communities with pressing health needs.
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