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  • Researchers use drones to count river dolphins in Brazil

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2017
    On a river in Brazil, a quadcopter drone whirred over the water, transmitting a stream of images to a computer. Researchers and the small aircraft had the same job: spotting river dolphins.
    Dolphin_Magazine_Summer2017
  • On Lobby Day, WWF activists head to Capitol Hill to engage leaders on conservation issues

    March 15, 2017

    The halls of Congress came alive on Tuesday as dozens of WWF activists from across the country met with their representatives to advocate for international conservation funding on Lobby Day 2017.

    activists walk up steps to Congressional building
  • Life along the Mekong: Two generations reflect on the value of clean, fresh water

    October 04, 2016

    While development undeniably brought about positive changes to those living along the Mekong, increased demand for water and economic growth are also leading to unsustainable infrastructure decisions. Compounded by climate change, these decisions threaten the river and all who depend on it.

    Vutra washes clothing in river
  • Data, data everywhere

    September 15, 2016

    Dams play a critical role in water resource management and electricity generation and, generally, they have a huge impact on freshwater biodiversity and sometimes on local communities. Surely it’s time for a consolidated research effort to provide big data on dams.

    River Ganga, Rishikesh, India
  • How can we use data to help protect the Mekong river basin?

    August 05, 2016

    Information is power— at least according to conventional wisdom. But what if we lack access to reliable and scientifically sound information? WWF and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have teamed up to create river basin report cards—very simple documents that demystify complex scientific information about river systems and take into account what different people value in any given basin.

    Children play in the Meoking river.
  • Addressing drought and other challenges in Mozambique

    August 02, 2016

    Participants of the weeklong workshop, which was hosted by WWF and the Natural Capital Project, learned how to map out Mozambique’s natural resources, why the resources are important, how to build them into decisions about infrastructure and development, and more.

    Mozambique is taking stock of its natural resources to better protect them for both wildlife and people.
  • Sustainable toilet diagram
  • James Redford on the power of telling stories to create positive change

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2016
    James Redford remembers a solitary walk in a snowstorm in Timpanogos Canyon, Utah, as the moment his love for nature “shifted into place and never left.”
    A dry canyon in the American southwest
  • Chris Dodd on making conservation accessible and why a river always runs through him

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2016
    Some of Chris Dodd's most enduring memories revolve around rivers.
    Chris Dodd
  • Newborn Irrawaddy dolphin spotted in Cambodia

    July 05, 2016

    WWF conservation experts were thrilled to spot an mother Irrawaddy dolphin with her newly born baby on the banks of the Mekong River in Cambodia. Just last month, the dolphin family was found in Kampi pool, which is home to around 20 of the last remaining 80 Irrawaddy river dolphins in Cambodia. The river dolphins are beloved icons in Cambodia and females give birth only every two to three years, so any birth creates a sensation.

    Irrawaddy Dolphin_Story_07052016
  • The tiger among fish

    May 19, 2016

    The king of India’s Himalayan rivers is the mighty mahseer. The mahseer are not just pretty; they're important too. The mahseer is a flagship species for India.  A flagship species is a species selected to act as an ambassador, icon or symbol for a defined habitat, issue, campaign or environmental cause. Today, five of India’s mahseer species are listed as “endangered” and two as “near threatened” in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    River in India
  • Saving Colombia's daredevil fish

    Fishers have been noticing dramatic changes to the Orinoco River, and the daredevil fish in particular. In short, they're harder to find and no longer travel as far upstream. In an effort to save Colombia’s migratory fish, WWF-Colombia, the National Authority for Aquaculture and Fisheries (AUNAP), and other partners are focused on promoting more sustainable fishing practices throughout the supply chain. And, with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), WWF is trying to shed more light on the health of rivers and their vast biodiversity through projects like the basin report card.

    A man fishing on the Orinoco River in Colombia.
  • What animals live in the Asia high mountains? And eight other Asia high mountains facts

    Species like red pandas, Bengal tigers, blue sheep, Argali wild sheep, and ibex are found in Asia high mountains. Learn more about the Asia high mountains and the work that WWF is doing to protect them.

    A horseback rider rides through the mountains
  • Capturing freshwater stories through the lens of a camera

    March 22, 2016

    Since 2011, photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz has travelled to eight countries capturing images for his long-term photographic project highlighting the global water crisis. Collectively, the photographs chart the diverse and far reaching effects of urbanization, poor sanitation, pollution, water scarcity, and the side effects of expanding industry and population.

    Women collecting water
  • New Irrawaddy dolphin calf sighted in the Mekong River

    March 07, 2016

    An Irrawaddy dolphin calf was spotted swimming alongside its mother in the Mekong River—an encouraging sign for the vulnerable species.

    Irrawaddy Dolphin
  • What's a river worth?

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    In Colombia’s portion of the Orinoco river basin, a cross section of society converges to assess a river’s health
    MKohut_COLOMBIA_Orinoco_River-075.jpg
  • Celebrating wetlands and their role in supporting communities worldwide

    February 02, 2016

    More than a billion people make a living from wetlands across the world. Wetlands provide livelihoods, from fishing and eco-tourism, to farming and drinking water for communities. WWF is working to support some of the world’s most vital wetlands and the communities that depend on them across Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

    wetlands in Brazil
  • Dolphin in an enclosure by the lake, waiting to be translocated
  • Continued success in the fight to save the finless porpoise from extinction

    December 17, 2015

    A healthy population of the critically endangered finless porpoises now lives in a safer part of the Yangtze River, thanks to dedicated efforts by WWF and our partners. Four adult porpoises—two male and two female—were carefully selected from a sample of 59 animals captured by a team of experts using specially designed nets from Tian-e-zhou National Oxbow Reserve.

    finless porpoise swimming
  • Conserving the Orinoco Basin for locals and tourists alike

    December 14, 2015

    WWF’s river basin report card could help protect the Orinoco for a future rich in green tourism. The report card will help everyone interested in the area—from ecotourism operators like Alejandro to industrial pioneers, to the public officials charged with managing the region—understand the current state of the Orinoco and how a healthy river is important to all.

    sunset over orinoco
  • Celebrating our conservation successes of 2015

    Every so often, it’s important to pause, take a step back, and celebrate the progress we’ve made together in conserving the world’s wildlife and beautiful places. And this year gave us much to applaud. Though our conservation challenges persist and there’s still much work to be done, we all need take a moment to appreciate just how far we’ve come by working in tandem to protect the planet we love.

    african elephants in KAZA
  • Partnering to protect a major river in South America

    The Orinoco is one of the longest rivers in South America. The river and its surrounding forests teem with wildlife: the Orinoco crocodile, river dolphins, colorful parrots, the giant anaconda. But the river basin is also under threat from human development.

    the orinoco river
  • At the Top of the World

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2015
    Snow leopards, fresh water & climate change
    Kyrgyzstan