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Sumatran Tiger Stories

Bengal Tiger in the Ranthambore National Park, India

In a blow to wildlife, China lifts a ban on the use of tiger and rhino parts

In an enormous setback for wildlife conservation, China announced it will allow hospitals to use tiger bone and rhino horn from captive-bred animals for traditional medicine. The decision reverses a decades-old ban that has been instrumental in preventing the extinction of endangered tigers and rhinos.

  • Rare footage shows successful tiger breeding

    July 30, 2018

    Rare footage of a tiger family offers exciting proof of tigers breeding successfully in the wild. The video shows a female tigress - named Rima - and her 3 cubs growing up in Central Sumatra. Rima then meets Uma, a male Sumatra tiger, and breeds successfully to have four more tiger cubs. Yet, tigers are endangered, facing a high risk of extinction in the wild. Today, there are only around 3,900 wild tigers worldwide. That’s more than a 95% decline from perhaps 100,000 just over a century ago.

    tiger footage Ministry of Environment and Forestry Indonesia
  • Sumatran tiger caught on camera

    July 29, 2018

    On top of a ridge of in Indonesia, a healthy male Sumatran tiger was spotted by camera traps earlier this year. An important conservation tool, the cameras are equipped with infrared sensors that take a picture whenever they sense movement in the forest and help support WWF’s intensive tiger monitoring in central Sumatra. 

    Sumatran tiger camera trap 3
  • 4 unseen benefits of protecting tigers and their habitat

    November 29, 2017

    From the world’s largest mangrove forests in the Sundarbans to temperate forests in the snowy mountains of Bhutan, protecting tigers and their natural homes helps provide benefits for thousands of other animals and millions of people.

    tiger in tall grass
  • World Heritage sites, strongholds for tiger and African elephant populations, endangered by illegal harvesting of species

    April 18, 2017

    A new report by WWF reveals that World Heritage sites are especially vulnerable to illegal harvesting of species listed by CITES, including tigers and African elephants.

    Sumatran tiger
  • A better road ahead for wild tigers

    November 23, 2016

    Earlier this year, WWF estimated an increase in the number of tigers worldwide, up to 3,890 in 2016 from an estimated 3,200 in 2010. But success to date is tenous: According to a new report from WWF, tigers now face a threat far greater than many we’ve tackled before: linear infrastructure.

    Sumatran tiger
  • Nine big wins for the world’s tigers

    November 17, 2016

    In November 2010, 13 tiger range countries came together and made an unprecedented pledge: to double the number of wild tigers by 2022. Mobilized by a century of dramatic decline, leaders convened in St. Petersburg, Russia to sign a declaration boosting tiger conservation efforts. This initial effort has led to significant momentum and progress, and for the first time in 100 years, tiger numbers are on the rise. Here are some highlights from the last six years. 

    Bengal cub walking in a meadow in India
  • For the first time in 100 years, tiger numbers are growing

    April 10, 2016

    After a century of constant decline, the number of wild tigers is on the rise! According to the most recent data, at least 3,890 tigers now exist in the wild—up from an estimated 3,200 in 2010.

    tiger in grass
  • New US regulations around captive tigers could provide a boost for wild tigers

    April 05, 2016

    Tiger populations fighting for a comeback in the wild will receive a much needed lifeline from the United States government. Improved and tightened regulations around captive tigers will make it more difficult for captive-bred tigers to filter into and stimulate the illegal wildlife trade that threatens wild tigers in Asia.

    Tigers
  • How nations are uniting to double the world's tigers

    Bringing tigers back from the brink takes commitment on a global scale. Faced with this challenge, tiger range countries took a stand and set an ambitious species conservation goal: double the number of wild tigers by 2022—the next Year of the Tiger. The goal is called Tx2.

    tiger in grass
  • Where do tigers live? And other tiger facts

    Tigers are the most iconic of the big cats. With their gorgeous black-and-orange coats and long, white whiskers, they invoke in many a feeling of wonder and admiration. But though they are adored, they’re also vulnerable to extinction. 

    Bengal tiger on a creek bank
  • Saving Thirty Hills

    August 12, 2015

    The Indonesian island of Sumatra—one of the most biodiverse places on the planet—has lost more than half of its forest cover in the last thirty years. But there are stands of amazing, still-intact forest in Sumatra, and Thirty Hills is one of them.

    Thirty Hills, Sumatra
  • An Amazing 103 Wild Tigers Counted in Bhutan

    July 29, 2015

    Bhutan is home to an amazing 103 wild tigers—an increase from a previous estimate of 75 that was not based on actual field surveys—according to the country’s first-ever tiger survey released on Global Tiger Day Conducted entirely by Bhutanese scientists, the survey spanned habitats ranging from snowy, cold mountains in the north—where both tigers and snow leopards roam wild—down to dense, subtropical forests in the south.

    Bengal tiger male walking beside lake in India
  • A Ranger Determined to Save Sumatra's Tigers

    October 01, 2013

    Abeng, coordinator of WWF’s Tiger Protection Units in Indonesia, has lived on the island of Sumatra his whole life. He leads our efforts to protect last wild tigers in Tesso Nilo-Bukit TigapuluhBukit Tigapuluh, or “30 Hills.”

    Abeng profile
  • Remarkable Images of Big Cats Urge Forest Protection

    November 15, 2011

    Camera trap photos capture five of the island’s big cat species in the wild.

    WWF is working hard to identify and document the amazing biodiversity of this region, including species such as this marbled cat, in order to help ensure that this area is appreciated and protected.
  • One fan at a time

    August 26, 2010