Infrastructure Stories

  • Changing how we build for people and nature in a rapidly warming world

    February 24, 2020

    We can and must rethink our approach to development—what it looks like, what it’s delivering, and how it’s meeting our needs—to ensure that it's more useful for people and less harmful to wildlife.

    A road grader smooths the dirt road in Alaska.
  • Can we build concrete that's less harmful to nature?

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    By 2050, it’s estimated that Earth will hold 75% more infrastructure than it does today, and much of it will be manufactured out of concrete. WWF is working to address the concrete problem.
    Concrete getting poured
  • A dam threatens wildlife life in the Lower Mekong Delta

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    WWF is advocating that energy investors replace plans for hydropower dams in Cambodia with large-scale solar farms, which are more environmentally friendly and quicker to build.
    Irrawaddy river dolphin in Cambodia
  • When infrastructure goes wrong for nature and people

    Infrastructure is the backbone of modern civilization, but when it’s poorly considered, planned, designed, developed or maintained, we endanger wildlife, wild places, and our own communities. Here's what we can do.

    Dawei Road cutting around a mountainside
  • Just one-third of the world's longest rivers remain free-flowing

    May 09, 2019

    Only a little more than one-third of the world’s 246 longest rivers remain free-flowing, drastically reducing the diverse benefits that healthy rivers provide to people and nature everywhere, according to a new study by WWF and partners.

    Free flowing rivers map
  • Plans for mega dams put Argentina’s Santa Cruz River—its wildlife, local livelihoods, and Perito Moreno Glacier—at risk

    November 01, 2018

    A pair of mega dams in construction on the Santa Cruz river’s banks could flood more than 135 square miles of the surrounding region--an area almost twice as big as Buenos Aires--and transform Argentina’s last free-flowing glacial river into a series of brackish pools.

    Perito Moreno Glacier Nathalie Racheter WW21919
  • An 83% decline of freshwater animals underscores the need to keep rivers connected and flowing

    October 30, 2018

    This year’s Living Planet Report shows that populations of animals—including mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians—plummeted by 60% between 1970 and 2014. But those living in freshwater are experiencing a far more drastic decline: 83% since 1970.

    water vole Terry Whittaker WW24406
  • A new plan to save Belize's livelihood-giving reef and coasts

    July 27, 2017

    The coastal nation of Belize is at a crossroads. In 2009, the reef system was added to UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger. It remains on the list today because of mangrove deforestation, unsustainable coastal development and offshore oil exploration. The good news is a coastal zone management plan can safeguard Belize’s natural assets and produce a win-win opportunity for the people and environment.

    Fish in the ocean in Belize.
  • Saving Belize’s magnificent and endangered barrier reef

    The coral reefs and coastal mangroves of Belize are necessary for both the wildlife that live there and the people who rely on it for income and protection. Help us save this threatened World Heritage site.

    Belize barrier reef
  • An artist's push to protect Alaska's breathtaking Bristol Bay

    January 19, 2016

    Apayo Moore and other young leaders like Alannah Hurley, Verner Wilson, and Katherine Carscallen have helped organize resistance to a mine that would negatively impact Bristol Bay: through public meetings, letter-writing campaigns and demonstrations, and testifying to all who will listen about the splendors of bay's salmon runs.

    artist Apayo Moore
  • New Dam on Mekong River Could Doom Irrawaddy Dolphins

    May 22, 2014

    An estimated 85 critically endangered Irrawaddy dolphins cling to survival in a stretch of the mighty Mekong River between Cambodia and Laos—exactly where Mega First Corporation Berhad is scheduled to begin construction of a massive dam in a few months.

    dolphin swimming
  • The Mighty Mekong at Risk

    November 07, 2012

    The Mekong River’s spectacular biodiversity, rich fisheries and the livelihoods of millions are all at grave risk after the government of Laos broke ground on November 7, 2012 on a massive hydropower dam. The Xayaburi dam will be the first dam to span the entire mainstem of the lower Mekong River—home to more than 1100 freshwater fish species.

    Greater Mekong People and Communities
  • Tigers Threatened by Proposed Dam

    Rare new footage shows a tigress and her cubs inside the forests of Thailand’s Mae Wong National Park. But along with this thrilling video comes news of a possible irreversible threat—a $400 million dam proposed on the nearby Mae Wong River.

    Indochinese Tiger
  • Victory for Mexican Marine Park

    June 19, 2012

    An ocean victory was declared on June 15, 2012 when Mexican President Felipe Calderón announced his decision to cancel the development permit for the Cabo Cortes mega tourist development. This development would have threatened the future of Cabo Pulmo Marine Park and the livelihoods of the local community.

    Cabo Pulmo