Toggle Nav

Kathryn S. Fuller Science for Nature Seminar Series

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to critical topics in international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe.

Since its beginning in 2007, the Fuller Science for Nature Seminar Series has hosted over 50 scientists with diverse specialties and has attracted thousands of attendees from different sectors of the conservation community.

Seminars are free, open to the public, and held at the WWF’s Washington, DC Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037).

2015

A Half Century of Conservation: How Did It Happen?
Tom Lovejoy, United Nations Foundation

Saving a Species: Vaquita
Lorenzo Rojas-Brancho, National Institute of Ecology/Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada; Rebecca Lent, Marine Mammal Commission, and Enrique Sanjurjo, WWF-Mexico

A Blooming Problem: The Disruptive Impacts of Climate Change on Nature's Calendar
Richard Primack, Boston University; Lizzie Wolkovich, Harvard University

Is human pressure on Earth driving the Anthropocene over the edge?
Marina Fischer-Kowalski, Alpen Adria University

2014

Synthetic Nature and the Future of Conservation
Kent Redford, Archiapelago Consulting

Do global market forces slow or grow habitat loss?
Eric Lambin, Stanford University and University of Louvain, Belgium

Monitoring global forest change at local scales using earth observation data
Matt Hansen, University of Maryland

Urban communities inspired by nature: connecting people and the planet
Tim Beatley, University of Virginia, and Stella Tarnay, George Washington University

Know your audience: influencing the American Public on climate change
Elke Weber, Columbia University; Matt Barreto, The University of Washington; and Molly Rauch, Mom’s Clean Air Force

2013

Going to Extremes: The Alarming Science Behind Climate Change’s Increasingly Wild Weather
Jennifer Francis, Rutgers University, and Stu Ostro, The Weather Channel

Think like an investor: making smart conservation decisions
Hugh Possingham, University of Queensland

Peak Cropland: Saving Room for Nature while Feeding Humanity throughout the 21st Century
Joe Fargione, The Nature Conservancy

SkyTruthing: Clean Up Your Act, The Crowd is Watching!
John Amos and Paul Woods, SkyTruth

Conservation Science for the Anthropocene—Boundaries, Tipping Points, and System Change
Joshua Tewksbury, Luc Hoffmann Institute

2012

Producing Wildlife: Managing a Conservation Reserve in India during the Anthropocene
Paul Robbins, University of Arizona

Can Social Networks Save Biodiversity?
Scott Loarie, Carnegie Institution for Science

Sustainability of World Fisheries & their contribution to global food security
Ray Hilborn, University of Washington

Farming the Future: Can we spare land for nature?
Navin Ramankutty, University of British Columbia

The facts are not enough: Overcoming public deadlock on climate change
Katharine Hayhoe, Texas Tech University

2011

The Panda and the Anthropocene: The Real Challenge for Conservation
Bill Adams, University of Cambridge

Farming’s Perennial Future
Jon Paul Rodriguez, Center for Ecology of the Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Investigations

Insights from Biodiversity Science for Addressing Global Sustainability Challenges
Georgina Mace, Imperial College London

The Future of Plants
Peter Crane, Yale University

Farming’s Perennial Future
Jerry Glover, U.S. Agency for International Development

2010

Elinor Ostrom, Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, Indiana University

Giving Science Away: Turning Tragedy to Hope in Humid Tropical Forest Conservation
Greg Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science

People and Nature: Conservation, Conflict, and Compromise
David Macdonald, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit

Ecological Consequences of Defaunation in Tropical Ecosystems
Rodolfo Dirzo, Stanford University

Ecological Restoration and Dreams of Natural Streams
Margaret Palmer, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

 

2009

Douglas R. Nader, Environmental Defense Fund

Dan Nepstad, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Paul R. Ehrlich, Stanford University

Andrew Baker, University of Miami

Carbon, Community and Livelihoods: Forest Commons in the 21st Century
Arun Agrawal, University of Michigan

Extreme Hydrological Conditions and Complex Channel Topology Drives Population Divergence and Speciation in the Lower Congo River
Melanie Stiassny, American Museum of Natural History

 

2008

Peter J. Mumby, University of Exeter

David S. Wilcove, Princeton University

Claire Kremen, University of California

Protecting the Large Pelagics: New technologies for marine conservation in the open ocean
Patrick N. Halpin, Duke University

Changing Dynamics of Tropical Deforestation and Atmospheric Carbon Emissions
Ruth DeFries, Columbia University

Dangerous anthropogenic interference: the latest insights
Micheal Oppenheimer, Princeton University

2007

Setting practical conservation priorities—and sequestering carbon to pay for them
Stuart Pimm, Duke University and University of Pretoria

Why Tropical Parks are Failing
John Terbough, Duke University

Social, Economic and Political Drivers of Bornean Deforestation and Fires: Implications for Carbon Emissions, Biodiversity and Rural Livelihoods.
Liz Curran, Yale University

Brave New Ocean
Jeremy Jackson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Paz con la Naturaleza: Costa Rica goes for Phase II Conservation
Dan Janzen, University of Pennsylvania

Sushi and Satellites: Tracking Giant Bluefin Tunas in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans
Barbara A. Block, Stanford University and Tag A Giant Foundation