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Stop Wildlife Crime: It's Dead Serious

In more than 50 years of conservation, we have never seen wildlife crime on such a scale. Wildlife crime is now the most urgent threat to three of the world's best-loved species—elephants, rhinos and tigers.

Illegal wildlife trade has exploded to meet increasing demand for elephant ivory, rhino horns, and tiger products, particularly in Asia. Controlled by dangerous crime syndicates, wildlife is trafficked much like drugs or weapons. Wildlife criminals often operate with impunity, making the trade a low-risk/high-profit business. Today, it is the fifth most profitable illicit trade in the world, estimated at up to $10 billion annually.

WWF is leading a global campaign to stop wildlife crime.

We are applying the strength of our worldwide network, our influence with partners and governments, and the passion of our supporters to a crisis that is threatening to undo years of conservation progress. The past year has already yielded some big wins like Thailand’s ban on their ivory trade and support from champions such as U.S. President Barack Obama. Join our campaign and help us:

  • Push governments to protect threatened animal populations by increasing law enforcement, imposing strict deterrents, reducing demand for endangered species products and honoring international commitments made under CITES.

  • Speak up on behalf of those on the frontlines being threatened by armed poachers so they are properly equipped, trained and compensated.

  • Reduce demand for illegal wildlife parts and products by encouraging others to ask questions and get the facts before buying any wildlife or plant product.

    You can make a difference h
    Tell the US government to stand by its commitment to stop commercial ivory trade

Latest News

New US ivory regulations mark victory in fight to save elephants

Setting an example for the world in the fight to save elephants, the United States finalized new regulations that will help shut down commercial ivory trade within its borders and stop wildlife crime overseas.

African Elephant