TNRC Guides | Model Results Chains

Image representing TNRC's four focus areas: wildlife, fisheries, forests, and finance

Targeting Natural Resource Corruption

Harnessing knowledge, generating evidence, and supporting innovative policy and practice for more effective anti-corruption programming

Model results chains


These TNRC Guides share practical knowledge for program designers and implementers to reduce corruption’s impact on conservation.

About these guides

These topic-specific TNRC Model Results Chains serve as a starting point to guide conservation and natural resource management practitioners through potential anti-corruption approaches that can be adapted to different contexts or activities. These Model Results Chains focus on four topic areas: 

  1. Integrating anti-corruption into law enforcement approaches
  2. Transparency and accountability for market-based incentives
  3. Social norms and behavior change for anti-corruption
  4. Integrating anti-corruption into traceability initiatives
SORALO community ranger uses binoculars while on morning patrol. Enkongu Enkare Naroosura station, Narok County, Kenya.

Integrating anti-corruption into law enforcement approaches

This model results chain illustrates how conservation and natural resource management practitioners could incorporate anti-corruption elements into a law enforcement activity. The chain focuses on the illegal wildlife trade, meaning here any unlawful activity related to profiting from fish, forests, and wild fauna. However, most of the information will be relevant to broader law enforcement against any crimes affecting the environment. This model results chain serves as a starting point and must be adapted to the specific context and objective of an activity.

Members of Lakehlaaii community forest are having meeting with WWF Myanmar staff Ko Zin

Transparency and accountability for market-based incentives

This model results chain illustrates how conservation and natural resource management practitioners could integrate transparency, accountability, and other open governance initiatives into a standard market-based incentive program. However, like any model, it is only a starting point, and it must be adapted to the specific context and objectives of a given activity. Not all of these factors will be applicable or feasible for all market-based initiatives, and all require careful adaptation and integration.

Wada village fishing camp community members making use of the water that the Barotse floodplain in Zambia provides.

Social norms and behavior change for anti-corruption

This model results chain illustrates how conservation and natural resource management practitioners could leverage social norms and behavior change (SNBC) for anti-corruption. Like any model, however, it is only a starting point. The factors in this chain can be adapted and integrated into a conservation activity, or they could be used as one strategy targeting a corruption norm that threatens a targeted conservation outcome.

The Regional Fishermen Meeting (Interpez), organized by the WWF Peru Marine Program and the Artisanal Fisheries Cooperative of La Islilla and La Tortuga.

Integrating anti-corruption into traceability initiatives

This model results chain illustrates how conservation and natural resource management practitioners could integrate anti-corruption into their traceability or other supply chain initiatives. However, like any model, it is only a starting point, and it should not be used “as is.” Not every factor will be applicable or feasible for all traceability initiatives, and all require careful adaptation and integration into the specific strategy or activity that is being designed.