USAID

WWF's enduring partnerships with USAID

WWF has partnered with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) for over 25 years to advance conservation and biodiversity protection initiatives around the world. Recognizing that nature is essential to international development and sustainable livelihoods, WWF has worked with USAID in over 40 countries to conserve natural resources; help communities protect and restore biodiversity; mitigate and adapt to climate change; promote gender equality; and reduce corruption.

WWF is committed to partnerships with governments and multilateral institutions at national, regional and global levels to ensure that people and nature can thrive. Working together, we leverage our best assets and develop solutions to the world’s most pressing conservation challenges.

Learn more about WWF’s conservation partnerships as part of our work with the U.S. government.

Featured projects

HELPING PEOPLE, WILDLIFE AND FORESTS IN VIET NAM

Decades of illegal logging and wildlife trade, poaching, and agricultural conversion in Viet Nam threaten vital ecosystems and exacerbate poverty in vulnerable communities. WWF is working with USAID, in coordination with the Government of Viet Nam, local communities, and other conservation partners, on the Biodiversity Conservation and Saving Threatened Wildlife projects to combat illegal wildlife trafficking and deforestation to conserve Viet Nam’s rich biodiversity while helping local communities develop sustainable sources of income.

ENHANCING FLOOD RESILIENCE IN PAKISTAN

Catastrophic flooding in Pakistan in 2022 demonstrated the urgency of the climate crisis. The Recharge Pakistan project – a collaboration between Pakistan's Ministry of Climate Change and the Federal Flood Commission, local communities, the Green Climate Fund, USAID, WWF and the Coca-Cola Foundation – works to reduce the region’s vulnerability to climate change through enhanced flood risk management

PARTNERING WITH INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN THE AMAZON

Indigenous people's active participation in the sustainable economic, cultural and environmental development of the Amazon is essential for the long-term conservation of the world's largest tropical rainforest. The USAID-funded Amazon Indigenous Rights and Resources project, managed by WWF in coordination with indigenous organizations and nonprofit partners, supports educational resources to expand indigenous leaders’ capacities in Brazil, Colombia and Peru, and helps indigenous enterprises with business development.

INCREASING CIVIL SOCIETY PARTICIPATION IN GREATER MEKONG ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Countries across the Greater Mekong – including Burma, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Viet Nam – face environmental challenges such as deforestation and water quality degradation that are often driven by poorly planned development, natural resource crime and corruption. The USAID-funded Mekong for the Future project implemented by WWF works increase the capacity of civil society organizations and citizens to engage in natural resource management policy development.

TARGETING NATURAL RESOURCE CORRUPTION

Corruption undermines sustainable natural resource management efforts, drives resources away from the public good and into private hands, and facilitates nature crimes. The USAID-funded Targeting Natural Resource Corruption (TNRC) project focused from 2018-2024 on harnessing knowledge, generating evidence, and supporting innovative policy and practice for more effective anti-corruption programming to conserve wildlife, fisheries, and forests. TNRC was a Leader with Associates award, implemented by WWF, in partnership with the U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre at the Chr. Michelsen Institute, TRAFFIC, and the Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center at George Mason University, in collaboration with the Basel Institute on Governance.

In Viet Nam, rescued tigers find a safe haven

When tigers are confiscated from the illegal trade or voluntarily surrendered by owners, they are transported to the Hanoi Wildlife Rescue Center where they are cared for, alongside other rescued animals, like birds and reptiles.

Close up of a tiger's face with blurred enclosure in the foreground