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  • Accelerating Tuna Sustainability through the Global FIP Alliance for Sustainable Tuna (G-FAST)

    Tuna are among the world’s more commercially valuable fish; strong global demand and excess of fishing fleets will likely cause stocks to decline if management strategies are not improved.

  • Pakistan’s tuna fleets lead efforts to untangle our oceans

    As part of the Common Oceans ABNJ Tuna Project, WWF is working onboard with vessel crews to improve scientific reporting and adjust gillnetting practices to monitor and reduce bycatch. This project demonstrated that vessel crews—uniquely positioned at the beginning of the supply chain—can be effective agents to develop best practice improvements and successfully implement them broadly.

    Gill net fisher on water
  • Universal Standards for Seafood Traceability

    The ocean provides a bounty of seafood, supporting hundreds of millions of jobs and feeding billions of people. But roughly a quarter of the fish caught globally is done illegally in the shadows, fueling a black market that exploits wildlife, people, and blind spots in enforcement of laws. A lack of transparency allows rogue vessels and criminal networks to operate undetected and profit off stolen fish, taking money out of the pockets of people who follow the rules and contributing to declines in ocean health. Ending this black-market trade of seafood is good for nature and people but will require an array of proven tools working in tandem, chief among them is traceability.

    Pulling up fishing nets.
  • Improving management in eastern Pacific tuna fisheries

    Management strategy evaluation (MSE) is a process that allows stakeholders to assess how effective different management strategies can be. WWF convened workshops on MSE in five tuna fishing nations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean: Ecuador, Panama, the United States, Mexico, and Colombia.

    Fishing boats on the water in Ecuador
  • Incorporating blue carbon in Kenya's national green house gas accounting

    WWF and the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute are carrying out a carbon stock assessment of the mangroves in Lamu County, Kenya, and plan to link this science to the country’s national climate policies.

    A researcher tests a soil core