Toggle Nav
  • Monitoring Tigers in Nepal

    A July 2012 camera trap study in Nepal identified 37 individual tigers—a marked increase from 18 tigers counted in 2009. The tigers were monitored over a three-month period inside Bardia National Park in Nepal and the Khata wildlife corridor in the Terai Arc Landscape.

    Tiger
  • Camera Trap Video of a Tiger

    WWF caught this tiger on camera in Malaysia. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Tiger Nepal Camera Trap
  • 2012 Fuller Symposium: Conservation Crime

    Global leaders shared their insights on the growing crisis of wildlife crime at the 2012 Fuller Symposium. The symposium was held on November 14, 2012 at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C.

    We are in the midst of a crisis. The criminal exploitation of nature — the illegal killing, capture, and trade of wild species — has escalated to the point where it could undo generations of conservation efforts.
  • The Urgent Issue of Captive Tigers

    Most people are surprised to learn that there are an estimated 5,000 captive tigers in America’. That’s more than all wild tigers across Asia. Almost 95 percent are privately owned, often by people not trained to care for animals in general, let alone tigers. Alarmingly, there is no accurate record or system to determine the actual number of tigers in the country, where they are, or what happens after they die.

  • Camera Trap Video of Sumatran Tiger Cubs

    Video cameras installed in the Sumatran jungle have captured close-up footage of a tiger and two cubs. This is  the first time that WWF has recorded evidence of tiger breeding in central Sumatra in what should be prime tiger habitat.

X

Our privacy policy will be changing. Read the new policy, which takes effect March 30.