Camera Traps Projects

  • Monitoring Tigers in Nepal

    A July 2012 camera trap study in Nepal identified 37 individual tigers—a marked increase from 18 tigers counted in 2009. The tigers were monitored over a three-month period inside Bardia National Park in Nepal and the Khata wildlife corridor in the Terai Arc Landscape.

    Tiger
  • Photos from Camera Traps in Indonesia

    On the Indonesian island of Sumatra, WWF collaborates with the Riau Forestry Department to use camera traps to help determine which species are present and absent from the region.

  • Photos from Camera Traps in China

    Camera traps are not the intricate and elaborate devices you might imagine. These innovative conservation tools are in fact nothing more than everyday cameras, armed with infrared sensors that take a picture whenever they sense movement in the forest.

    A passing panda
  • Camera Trap Photos of Amur Leopards

    A camera trap in a protected area in Russia has captured photos of eight Amur – one of the world’s most endangered wild cats. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Amur leopard
  • Photos from Camera Traps in the Amazon

    The Amazon's lush forests are home to a stunning variety of life. WWF has captured images of the some of the region's magnificent species – from jaguars to armadillos.