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Projects

  • Camera Trap Photos of Amur Leopards

    A camera trap in a protected area in Russia has captured photos of eight Amur – one of the world’s most endangered wild cats. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Amur leopard
  • Photos from Camera Traps in the Amazon

    The Amazon's lush forests are home to a stunning variety of life. WWF has captured images of the some of the region's magnificent species – from jaguars to armadillos.

  • Photos from Camera Traps in Nepal

    Camera traps placed in the Terai Arc Landscape revealed a variety of images of big cats, rhinos, elephants and more. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

  • Protecting Salmon in Western Alaska and Eastern Russia

    Among indigenous communities of Western Alaska and Eastern Russia, Chinook and chum salmon are essential elements of nutritional, cultural and economic life. Salmon are also essential to bears, eagles and for nutrient transport from the ocean to the banks of rivers. WWF works with indigenous communities to ensure these salmon remain abundant in the Bering Sea for subsistence, recreational and commercial harvest.

  • Helping Create Prosperous Community Forest Enterprises in Cameroon

    From 2007 to 2010, WWF ran the Community-based Forest Enterprises Project (CBFE) in Cameroon. The program focused on teaching participating communities sustainable forestry techniques and business management skills.