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Projects

  • Camera Trap Video of a Rhino

    WWF captured the first-ever camera trap video of a rhino in Borneo. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

  • Camera Trap Photos of Amur Leopards

    A camera trap in a protected area in Russia has captured photos of eight Amur – one of the world’s most endangered wild cats. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

    Amur leopard
  • Photos from Camera Traps in the Amazon

    The Amazon's lush forests are home to a stunning variety of life. WWF has captured images of the some of the region's magnificent species – from jaguars to armadillos.

  • Photos from Camera Traps in Nepal

    Camera traps placed in the Terai Arc Landscape revealed a variety of images of big cats, rhinos, elephants and more. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film.

  • Managing Marine Resources in the South Pacific

    The marine resources of the South Pacific region are threatened by major challenges. WWF believes that sustainable livelihood, development and conservation efforts are most successful when community groups adopt conservation initiatives and make their own management choices.

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