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Oceans Stories

  • How LED nets help sea turtles swim free

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    Entanglement in fishing nets and lines is among the greatest threats to sea turtles worldwide. So WWF and partners designed the world’s first solar-powered LED fishing net.
    Turtle buoy net
  • Mighty Mangroves

    Mangroves are a vibrant part of coastal wetlands on five continents. Explore some of the most diverse coastal forests around the world.

    A view of mangroves along the coast from the water
  • Depths Unknown

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    WWF is aiding the Fijian government and local communities in their efforts to establish a network of marine protected areas that will cover 30% of the country’s waters by 2030.
    Bai Ni Takali
  • Port Heiden, Alaska: the town that moved

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    Beginning in 1981, the coastal community was forced to move inland when it became clear that erosion, accelerated by retreating sea ice and strong storms, would one day take the town altogether.
    Riverbank
  • Setting the line on transparency in tuna fishing

    January 28, 2020

    For tuna fishing, data is more important now than ever. Most tuna stocks are fully exploited, meaning at best there is little to no room for expansion and at worst, they are in danger of collapsing. That’s why unmonitored tuna fishing is unacceptable. Commercial tuna fishing is increasingly transparent—but more needs to be done

    Northern bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) in tuna ranching company's (Ecolo Fish) cages, being fattened for the sushi market, Mediterranean Sea, Spain.
  • What we learned about coral reefs in 2019

    January 07, 2020

    While most of what we learned about coral reefs in 2019 is grim, there's still hope. In this new decade, we can do quite a bit to protect coral reefs and the wildlife and people that depend on them.

    Gabby Ahmadia, senior marine scientist at WWF, surveys a reef in the Selat Dampier MPA, Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia
  • 5 ways harmful fisheries subsidies impact coastal communities

    November 21, 2019

    Our planet’s health—and our own well-being—is dependent on a vibrant ocean rich with nature, like fish! While sustainable fishing can be an effective way to keep our oceans healthy, one big barrier is standing in the way: taxpayer-funded support for unsustainable fishing operations.

    Fishermen on artisanal fishing boats, out at sea, Tema, Ghana.
  • Developers say Pebble Mine won’t hurt Alaska's Bristol Bay.

    A gold and copper mine proposed for the headwaters of Bristol Bay would hugely impact the watershed—but the federal agency assigned to evaluate the mining company’s plan says there’s no risk. That assessment doesn’t stand up to a fact check.

    Bristol Bay, Alaska, from the air
  • Seagrass: the lesser-known superstar in the fight against the climate crisis

    October 31, 2019

    Seagrass is crucial to the health of our ocean and provides food and shelter for a ton of animals. But this leafy green marvel’s real superpower is the rate at which it captures heat-trapping carbon.

    Seagrass bed in the United Kingdom
  • Melting Down and Rising Up

    September 25, 2019

    What should be frozen solid is now thawing and melting away—and communities are already dealing with the consequences. From Alaska to Miami to Bangladesh, learn how ice loss and sea level rise are impacting communities.

    Miami skyline from the water
  • One billion people threatened by climate crisis risks to oceans, polar, and mountain regions

    September 25, 2019

    Drastic and swift-moving changes to our oceans and the cryosphere—the Earth’s snow and ice-covered places—are one of the most dramatic consequences of global warming.

    Permafrost thawing in Alaska
  • Scientists confirm second-lowest summer sea ice extent in the Arctic

    An analysis of satellite imagery determined the annual sea ice minimum in 2019 tied the record for second-lowest.

    Aerial view of sea ice off the coast of Greenland
  • Alaska Resilient and Rising

    A close look at the coastline reveals thawing permafrost oozing over the snow along the Chukchi Sea. The Arctic is warming twice as fast—and quite possibly faster—than any other place on the planet.

    Permafrost thawing in Alaska
  • From the front lines of climate change, Arctic Youth Ambassador Gabriel Stenek shares one village’s story

    September 03, 2019

    Located on a tiny island in the Chukchi Sea, just north of the Bering Strait and 20 miles below the Arctic Circle, Shishmaref has struggled for decades with coastal erosion and flooding attributed to climate change. Arctic Youth Ambassador, Gabriel Stenek share's its story.

    Portrait of WWF Arctic Youth Ambassador.
  • Change at sea: walrus haul-outs and climate change

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The ground has shifted beneath the Pacific walrus. We need to take urgent action to limit the worst impacts of climate change and decrease the strain on these creatures.
    Walrus hauled out
  • Miami Rising Up


    Miami is often dubbed the "ground zero" for climate change. But as sea levels rise, so, too, does a generation of leaders showing the world what climate action looks like and fighting for the only home we know.

    Miami skyline from the water
  • Four threats to manatees and mangroves in Florida – and how we can save them

    Manatees love mangroves; they use them for food and a quiet place to rest and raise their young. But these two key features of the Florida coasts are in trouble.

    Manatee beneath a river surface
  • Kelp is a win for you, the ocean, and the planet

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Seaweed is highly nutritious, easy to grow, and beneficial to ocean ecosystems. Learn more about this hardy, resilient macro algae is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity.
    Kelp farm
  • The Whales of Antarctica

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Whales don’t recognize national boundaries. But they do have core geographies and habitats where they most often roam—whether to rest, mate, frolic, or feed. Discover a few of the Antarctic’s whales.
    graphic whale5 fall2019
  • Hot spot

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    As global temperatures shoot up, the vast storehouse of ice in Antarctica is at risk. A team tags whales, shares data, and works together to protect a changing ecosystem at the bottom of the world.
    Humpback breaching
  • What do sea turtles eat? Unfortunately, plastic bags.

    Plastic has only been mass-produced since the 1940s, but it’s having a devastating impact on sea turtles. Many of us are doing our part to reduce plastic pollution by recycling and reducing single-use items, but governments must also step up to take accountability and end this pollution epidemic.

    A turtle swims toward a plastic bag
  • Plastic in the ocean

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The problem of plastic in nature, particularly in our oceans, is a global crisis. Learn what WWF is doing to stop plastics from leaking into our oceans.
    Garbage in ocean
  • Stemming the tide

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Lauren Spurrier, vice president for oceans conservation, describes how our seas are transforming in unprecedented, life-altering ways—and lays out how WWF is working to save them for us all.
    Walrus crowded on sea ice
  • Running a tight ship

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The network of cameras on purse-seine tuna vessels, combined with the enhanced monitoring system, prevents illegal, unreported, and unregulated catches from entering the marketplace.
    Workers sorting tuna