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Oceans Stories

Manatee beneath a river surface

Four threats to manatees and mangroves in Florida – and how we can save them

Manatees love mangroves; they use them for food and a quiet place to rest and raise their young. But these two key features of the Florida coasts are in trouble.

  • Change at sea: walrus haul-outs and climate change

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The ground has shifted beneath the Pacific walrus. We need to take urgent action to limit the worst impacts of climate change and decrease the strain on these creatures.
    Walrus hauled out
  • Kelp is a win for you, the ocean, and the planet

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Seaweed is highly nutritious, easy to grow, and beneficial to ocean ecosystems. Learn more about this hardy, resilient macro algae is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity.
    Kelp farm
  • The Whales of Antarctica

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Whales don’t recognize national boundaries. But they do have core geographies and habitats where they most often roam—whether to rest, mate, frolic, or feed. Discover a few of the Antarctic’s whales.
    graphic whale5 fall2019
  • Hot spot

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    As global temperatures shoot up, the vast storehouse of ice in Antarctica is at risk. A team tags whales, shares data, and works together to protect a changing ecosystem at the bottom of the world.
    Humpback breaching
  • What do sea turtles eat? Unfortunately, plastic bags.

    Plastic has only been mass-produced since the 1940s, but it’s having a devastating impact on sea turtles. Many of us are doing our part to reduce plastic pollution by recycling and reducing single-use items, but governments must also step up to take accountability and end this pollution epidemic.

    A turtle swims toward a plastic bag
  • Plastic in the ocean

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The problem of plastic in nature, particularly in our oceans, is a global crisis. Learn what WWF is doing to stop plastics from leaking into our oceans.
    Garbage in ocean
  • Stemming the tide

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Lauren Spurrier, vice president for oceans conservation, describes how our seas are transforming in unprecedented, life-altering ways—and lays out how WWF is working to save them for us all.
    Walrus crowded on sea ice
  • How tagging whales can help us understand ocean pollution

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Microplastics have accumulated abundantly in the Mediterranean. WWF is analyzing traces of plastic we find in whales to understand the strain that rising pollution puts on our oceans and marine life.
    Whale with arrow
  • Running a tight ship

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The network of cameras on purse-seine tuna vessels, combined with the enhanced monitoring system, prevents illegal, unreported, and unregulated catches from entering the marketplace.
    Workers sorting tuna
  • Our oceans are haunted by ghost nets: Why that's scary and what we can do

    June 25, 2019

    Ghost nets don’t only catch fish; they also entangle sea turtles, dolphins and porpoises, birds, sharks, seals, and more. Since hundreds of animals can be caught in a single net, you can see just how monumental this threat is.

    empty fishing net
  • World leaders can keep more fish in the ocean by ending this one practice

    June 18, 2019

    In fishing, money is a strong motivator that can incentivize people to improve practices and fund the management necessary to reduce fishing’s footprint on the natural world. But spending money in the wrong ways can also exacerbate the consequences of overfishing.

    fish with trawl fishing net
  • New technology helps WWF and partners study whales in one of the most remote places on the planet

    May 21, 2019

    Using new technology, like drones and digital tags, researchers have found that nearly every part of the Antarctica peninsula is important for whales’ feeding and resting. But it is also a hotspot for global climate change. WWF is calling for the protection of this remote wilderness in or effort to preserve 30% of the oceans by 2030.

    whale fluke Chris Johnson
  • US failing to meet Arctic protection goals

    April 30, 2019

    Though the US government is meeting some of its commitments in the Arctic, not enough is being done and, in many instances, the government is backsliding, according to a new analysis.

    arctic fox WW266664 Donna Pomeroy
  • How can we make farmed seafood more sustainable?

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    Focusing on shrimp and salmon, WWF is working to improve aquaculture practices through tech innovations like forensic analysis of farmed products and traceability software.
    20 percent of the fish harvested from the ocean are used to feed farmed fish
  • In Pakistan, better fishing strategies keep vulnerable sea life in the water

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    A multipronged ocean conservation strategy that WWF-Pakistan began in 2012 is now saving tens of thousands of dolphins, sea turtles, and other vulnerable marine species every year.
    Swimming sea turtle
  • Meet the giants of the Pacific Ocean

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2019
    Waters between the Galápagos Islands and Ecuador attract migratory sea life, gather one of the world’s largest known populations of giant manta rays, and act serve as a whale shark breeding ground.
    Whale shark with snorkler
  • The Long Game

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2019
    How policy, enforcement, and earning the trust of local fishers protected one of the most diverse coastlines in the world.
    Dolphins off the coast of Ecuador
  • A Galápagos community balances tourism and conservation

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2019
    Tourist boats used to flock to Floreana Island for day tours without previously booking, leaving the community unprepared. With WWF's help, residents redesigned their tourism model for the long term.
    Seal swimming underwater
  • Bizarre crustaceans make a big splash in the scientific world

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2019
    Some bizarre crustaceans have made a big splash in the scientific world. They're blind. They live in extreme deep-sea environments. And they're so hairy that they've become known as "yeti crabs."
    Illustration of kiwa puravida
  • Meet the master of camouflage, the day octopus

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2019
    Day octopuses live in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. While they aren’t endangered, these masters of disguise are often found in coral reefs—and those reefs face steep challenges.
    Day octopus
  • Imperiled polar bears face new threat in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    In some areas of the Arctic, female polar bears are more frequently choosing to build their maternity dens on land, rather than sea ice. The land provides the stability and security that sea ice no longer can—at least until human activity comes into the picture.

    Polar bear and cub
  • We’re one step closer to keeping trash and plastic out of our oceans

    October 18, 2018

    Nearly 124,000 WWF activists from 49 states reached out to their member of Congress to support a bipartisan bill to take a stand on ocean plastic, and their impressive efforts paid off.

    humback whale jump
  • Mangroves mean life for coastal communities throughout the tropics

    Mangroves provide valuable services for people and the planet but they’re disappearing at an alarming rate and human activity is mostly to blame. Explore these forests in this photo essay and learn what WWF is doing to bring back 20% of the mangroves we’ve lost by 2030.

    Mangroves in Placencia, Belize.
  • Belize’s incredible barrier reef is removed from UNESCO’s List of World Heritage in Danger

    June 26, 2018

    Thanks to a series of conservation measures enacted by Belize’s government, the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System has been removed from the UNESCO List of World Heritage in Danger sites. 

    Fish and coral. Hol Chan Marine Reserve, Ambergris caye, Belize, Central America.