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  • The tiger among fish

    May 19, 2016

    The king of India’s Himalayan rivers is the mighty mahseer. The mahseer are not just pretty; they're important too. The mahseer is a flagship species for India.  A flagship species is a species selected to act as an ambassador, icon or symbol for a defined habitat, issue, campaign or environmental cause. Today, five of India’s mahseer species are listed as “endangered” and two as “near threatened” in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    River in India
  • What kind of animals live in KAZA? And four other KAZA facts

    The Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) is home to almost half of Africa’s elephants, as well as an array of other animals such as African wild dogs, hippos, rhinos, lions, African buffalo, zebras, crocodiles, and cheetahs. Learn more about KAZA and what WWF is doing for it.

    Elephants at sunset in Namibia
  • Saving Colombia's daredevil fish

    Fishers have been noticing dramatic changes to the Orinoco River, and the daredevil fish in particular. In short, they're harder to find and no longer travel as far upstream. In an effort to save Colombia’s migratory fish, WWF-Colombia, the National Authority for Aquaculture and Fisheries (AUNAP), and other partners are focused on promoting more sustainable fishing practices throughout the supply chain. And, with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), WWF is trying to shed more light on the health of rivers and their vast biodiversity through projects like the basin report card.

    A man fishing on the Orinoco River in Colombia.
  • Population of world's most endangered marine mammal drops 40 percent

    May 13, 2016

    The vaquita porpoise is growing nearer to extinction: Population has declined 40% to around 60 individuals, down from an estimated population of 97 vaquitas in 2014.

    Fins
  • Sockeye salmon and climate change

    It’s hard to talk about salmon without talking Bristol Bay. Each year, at the end of June, in the world’s biggest sockeye salmon run, millions of fish flood the area’s rivers providing local communities with sustenance, fueling marine and seaside businesses, and contributing up to two-thirds of the state’s total salmon fishery value. But as June turned to July, there were hardly any salmon in Bristol Bay. People feared the worst. Where had all the fish gone?

    Rivers flowing and mountains in Alaska
  • Collaborating to Count Arctic Seals and Polar Bears

    May 11, 2016

    American and Russian scientists have now teamed up, with some help from WWF, to develop the region’s first comprehensive and reliable population estimates of ringed and bearded seals and polar bears.

  • Meet WWF's new Chief Scientist Dr. Rebecca Shaw

    WWF’s new Chief Scientist Dr. Rebecca Shaw is a brilliant thought leader who has been researching and leading interdisciplinary approaches to conservation and climate change for more than 30 years.

    Rebecca Shaw
  • Celebrating an amazing two years of zero rhino poaching in Nepal

    May 02, 2016

    Nepal marked two consecutive years since its last rhino was poached on May 2, 2014. This exceptional success is a result of a combination of high-level political will and government entities, and the active involvement of conservation communities.

    rhino in grass
  • 5 remarkable animal moms

    May 02, 2016

    The animal kingdom is flush with moms that take the time to teach their babies how to find food and protect themselves against the elements.

    Emperor penguin babies
  • New commitments for a brighter future in Guatemala’s Sierra de las Minas

    With a shared vision to preserve and restore the health of watersheds linked to the Sierra de las Minas, WWF and The Coca-Cola Company in Guatemala recently signed a five-year agreement to protect 350 hectares of forests connected to the Pasabién River basin in Zacapa, Guatemala, through prevention and control of forest fires.

    sierra minas landscape
  • WWF celebrates and supports ranching stewardship programs

    Ranchers are often the first to admit they prefer to shy away from the spotlight. However, when they do participate, there is an opportunity to elevate the conversation about North American sustainable beef production and private lands stewardship while celebrating innovation and leadership with their peers. WWF supports stewardship award recognition programs in all five Northern Great Plains states (MT, ND, SD, WY, NE), where ranchers manage the majority of the NGP’s remaining intact grasslands. 

    Lyle Perman
  • Making shrimp sustainable in Thailand

    Shrimp farming is associated with mangrove destruction, water pollution, and illegal fishing and labor practices, but WWF is working with some of the world’s most innovative and conscientious farmers to demonstrate that shrimp production can be environmentally sustainable, socially responsible, and economically viable.

    farming shrimp
  • Contributors: Summer 2016

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
  • Hero NGP
  • What is ivory and why does it belong on elephants?

    We’ve all seen photographs of majestic elephants sporting long, off-white tusks on either side of their trunks. This ivory is both beautiful on the animals and essential to the species’ survival. But what exactly is it?

    elephant standing in field
  • A symbol of hope: US designates bison as the national mammal

    April 27, 2016

    The bison—a resilient and iconic species roaming our Northern Great Plains—now serves as the national mammal of the United States, celebrating a species once on the brink of extinction.

    bison charging
  • How a simple technology is saving turtles

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    Turtle Excluder Device
  • Ice cream's impact on the environment

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
  • Night vision: how WWF helped rangers illuminate the darkness

    April 26, 2016

    WWF designed and installed a camera and software system smart enough to both distinguish human movement from that of animals and to alert rangers of the presence of poachers. What does this mean for conservation?

    setting up the camera
  • Two African elephants roaming the flowery grass land in Tanzania
  • Buffalo people unite

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    Two tribes and a host of partners rally to restore the buffalo to tribal lands
    WWF171-flipped.jpg
  • After devastating earthquake, Nepal aims to reduce the risk of disaster through green rebuilding

    April 25, 2016

    Last April, Nepal experienced a devastating earthquake, resulting in a tragic loss of life and damage. But the people of this small and beautiful country are pushing forward with remarkable resilience. They’ve also taken care to consider the environment during the rebuilding period.

    landslide in Nepal
  • Where in the world can we make room for more tigers?

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    If we succeed in doubling the number of tigers in the wild, what new territories could they expand into?
  • This Earth Day, a global climate transformation is underway

    April 21, 2016

    Every year, Earth Day connects people across the US and the world through advocacy and action to protect our planet. And this year is particularly special: heads of state and foreign ministers from more than 120 countries will come together in New York to formally sign an agreement to act on climate.

    Supporters at the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, September 21, 2014. Scenes from the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, September 21, 2014. 20.09.2014