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Narayan Shahi from the Rapid Response Team is arriving in a house to help villagers to deal with a wildlife conflict in Khata Corridor, Nepal.

Rapid Response Teams act as a bridge between wildlife and people

Established by WWF Nepal in 2016, RRTs help to engage communities in wildlife protection efforts, manage human-wildlife conflict, and monitor poaching and other illegal activities. Today, there are nearly 60 RRTs across Nepal.

  • A wake-up call on agriculture’s role in climate change

    August 08, 2019

    The connection between food and land use and global climate change is the subject of a special report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a United Nations body that assesses the science of climate change for the benefit of global policymakers. IPCC’s August 2019 report focuses especially on the impact of agriculture—with good reason.

    Iowa agricultural land.
  • Empowering women and families to build healthy communities and a healthy planet

    Meeta is a young mother from India. Back-to-back pregnancies and heavy housework responsibilities took a toll on her health and wellbeing. Noting her declining health, a neighborhood social worker invited Meeta and her husband Ramkishore to participate in a CARE maternal health program that fostered open communication, education and access to family planning information.

    Overshoot
  • Overfishing is jeopardizing our oceans

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
  • What does transboundary conservation mean and why does it matter?

    Transboundary conservation means countries that share natural resources work together to manage them wisely, for the benefit of all.

    Plains Zebra (Equus burchellii) herd running.
  • Four threats to manatees and mangroves in Florida – and how we can save them

    Manatees love mangroves; they use them for food and a quiet place to rest and raise their young. But these two key features of the Florida coasts are in trouble.

    Manatee beneath a river surface
  • Can forensics save forests?

    It's hard to identify a tree species by looking at just the wood. We rarely know whether the tree listed on the label of wood products is accurate—or legal. WWF is looking to forensics for answers.

    Plimob furniture factory reclaimed wood
  • What can camera traps tell us about tigers and their homes?

    Understanding how many tigers live in a given place is crucial to protecting them and their homes. To count these iconic big cats, we look to camera traps. Here's how we use them and what we learn.

    Tiger caught on camera trap in Nepal
  • The case for the right kind of logging in Peru

    July 23, 2019

    The sounds of Peru’s jungles are akin to those of a symphony. The high-pitched calls of toucans, the slow roar of howler monkeys, and the buzzing of insects together create unforgettable melodies. But these natural harmonies do more than simply please the ear—they provide us with valuable information about the health of the forest.

    Macaws Amazon, Peru - Rainforest
  • Kelp is a win for you, the ocean, and the planet

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Seaweed is highly nutritious, easy to grow, and beneficial to ocean ecosystems. Learn more about this hardy, resilient macro algae is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity.
    Kelp farm
  • The Whales of Antarctica

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Whales don’t recognize national boundaries. But they do have core geographies and habitats where they most often roam—whether to rest, mate, frolic, or feed. Discover a few of the Antarctic’s whales.
    graphic whale5 fall2019
  • Panda Paddle returns with a new way to stand up for wildlife

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Panda Paddle returns to San Diego this year on Oct. 26. WWF is also launching a new way to get involved: On Aug. 24, you can paddle at your favorite local spot and then share your experience online.
    Paddle boarder
  • Hot spot

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    As global temperatures shoot up, the vast storehouse of ice in Antarctica is at risk. A team tags whales, shares data, and works together to protect a changing ecosystem at the bottom of the world.
    Humpback breaching
  • A photographer invites people into conservation

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Mittermeier is an award-winning photographer, influencer, and activist for environmental conservation and sustainable living. She founded the International League of Conservation Photographers.
    Mittermeier with lizard
  • President's Letter: Portrait of a healthy planet

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    What comes to mind when we think about conservation?
    Carter Roberts
  • What do sea turtles eat? Unfortunately, plastic bags.

    Plastic has only been mass-produced since the 1940s, but it’s having a devastating impact on sea turtles. Many of us are doing our part to reduce plastic pollution by recycling and reducing single-use items, but governments must also step up to take accountability and end this pollution epidemic.

    A turtle swims toward a plastic bag
  • Plastic in the ocean

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The problem of plastic in nature, particularly in our oceans, is a global crisis. Learn what WWF is doing to stop plastics from leaking into our oceans.
    Garbage in ocean
  • Inspire a lifetime love of wildlife with WWF's Wild Classroom

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Kids are innately curious about wildlife and wild places.
    Classroom with fish on board
  • A photographer saves a turtle; his photograph may save more

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    It was a clear, calm day at the end of summer.
    Turtle caught in net
  • Stemming the tide

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Lauren Spurrier, vice president for oceans conservation, describes how our seas are transforming in unprecedented, life-altering ways—and lays out how WWF is working to save them for us all.
    Walrus crowded on sea ice
  • Meet Dr. Pam Matson, WWF's newly appointed board of directors chair

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    In late 2018, newly appointed WWF Board of Directors chair Dr. Pamela Matson joined the staff of WWF-US for an informal conversation. Take a look!
    Roberts and Matson
  • Gallery: Art by Mandy Barker

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Mandy Barker grew up collecting shells and driftwood on the beach near her home on the British coast. Now, she collects plastic.
    SOUP: BURNT
  • Dr. Dominic Andradi-Brown on protecting coral reefs

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    As a marine scientist with the WWF, Brown has worked with local experts in Indonesia to help inform how communities and governments can better protect and manage their coral reef ecosystems.
    DOMINIC ANDRADI-BROWN
  • Gail and John Eyler on reconnecting with nature

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Gail and John are involved with numerous environmental causes. We spoke with Gail recently about what conservation means to the two of them.
    Beach landscape
  • Running a tight ship

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The network of cameras on purse-seine tuna vessels, combined with the enhanced monitoring system, prevents illegal, unreported, and unregulated catches from entering the marketplace.
    Workers sorting tuna