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Two women use the river to wash up while avoiding the threat of crocodiles along the Luangwa River.

Saving a beloved home along the Luangwa River in Zambia

The Luangwa River is one of the longest remaining free-flowing rivers in Southern Africa. It flows through an area which boasts some of the most pristine habitats left in Zambia for elephants, lions, leopards and a myriad of other wildlife. A dam has been proposed on the Luangwa that would flood almost the entire Luembe chiefdom, destroying habitats and displacing thousands of people.  

  • Why we must help Bristol Bay now

    April 02, 2018

    Bristol Bay, Alaska is one of the most productive marine ecosystems in the world and the source of the world's largest wild salmon fishery. Yet its future is in jeopardy from the proposal for Pebble Mine. Now the US Army Corps of Engineers is attempting to fast track the mine's permit application and we must take action now.

    bristol bay aerial
  • A small-scale farmer leads the way for big changes to rubber farming in Myanmar

    March 27, 2018

    Hey Mer is not just producing good quality rubber, she is doing so in accordance with farming practices that don’t degrade the forests or mistreat workers. Such steps are necessary to protect the environment and human rights, but also to ensure good rubber prices for farmers and a long-lasting rubber industry.

    Hey Mer in Myanmar
  • Lack of winter sea ice disrupts life in the Arctic

    March 23, 2018

    It’s the second-worst winter for sea ice in the Arctic. As this rapid warming trend continues, entire ecosystems are unraveling and the consequences are impacting daily life in the Arctic as well as life in coastal communities thousands of miles away.

     
    diomede island arctic
  • Rivers mouth of Teles Pires and Juruena, forming the Tapajos River.
  • An important win for the world's largest tropical wetland

    March 22, 2018

    Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay signed an unprecedented declaration that calls for sustainable development of the Pantanal, a 42-million-acre wetland that touches each country. The decision follows years of collaboration among the governments that are securing a prosperous future for one of the most biologically rich ecosystems on the planet.

    The Pantanal from above
  • An illegal logger in Tanzania becomes a forest defender

    March 21, 2018

    When his three daughters were hungry, Omary Mbunda would turn to illegal timber for money. That changed when the CARE-WWF Alliance—a partnership focused on creating food systems that better nourish vulnerable communities while supporting healthy ecosystems—began promoting sustainable forestry management and conservation agriculture in Mbondo in 2015.

    Portrait of Mbunda
  • Last male northern white rhino dies

    March 21, 2018

    On March 19, 2018 the last male northern white rhino died. Sudan, 45 years old, had been under armed guard to protect him from the threat of poachers. His death is heartbreaking. The extinction of the northern white rhino is happening before our eyes.

    rhino
  • 9 reasons for hope in the face of climate change

    March 20, 2018

    At WWF, we’re engaging with millions of Americans, leading businesses, and government leaders to tackle climate change. Here are nine reasons why we’re hopeful in the face of this threat.

    solar panels in Washington state
  • Activists make a splash on Capitol Hill advocating for international conservation funding

    March 15, 2018

    Activists from around the country assembled on Capitol Hill for WWF’s Lobby Day 2018 to persuade lawmakers to maintain the amount of funding the United States government provides for international conservation programs.

    Activists from Maryland stand in front of the Capitol Building
  • Climate change could imperil half of plant and animal species in the world’s most naturally rich areas

    March 13, 2018

    Up to half of plant and animal species in the world’s most naturally rich areas—including the Amazon and the Galápagos—could face extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked.

    Panda at top of a tree
  • Love lobster tails? Thank The Bahamas’ Mia Isaacs

    March 07, 2018

    As president of the Bahamas Marine Exporters Association and managing director of Heritage Seafood, a leading lobster processor, Mia is working with her fellow exporters, fishermen, the Bahamian government, and international NGOs like WWF and The Nature Conservancy to ensure lobsters are fished sustainably. 

    Spiny Lobster
  • Across Mozambique and Tanzania, women show us how to improve communities and protect our planet

    March 07, 2018

    As WWF works with communities around the world to preserve habitats, wildlife, and natural resources, we know that it is critical to engage both women and men for the best results—environmentally, socially, and economically.

    A group of women and children from the Sicubir community, Angoche, Mozambique
  • As monarch butterflies lose ground in Mexico, WWF seeks solutions in America’s heartland

    When we think of wild animals losing their habitats, we usually envision elephants, rhinos, and tigers in faraway places. But monarch butterflies are losing their homes right here in the US—and our food is playing a part.

    Monarch among goldenrod
  • One Arctic town's very busy polar bear patrol

    February 26, 2018

    In 2007, nine polar bear conflicts were registered in all of Greenland. By 2017, there were 21 conflicts between August and December in the village of Ittoqqortoormiit alone. In almost all of the 21 cases, the local polar bear patrol was called to ensure that the bears were scared away from the community and kept under observation.

    polar bear patrol in Greenland
  • 3 things you should know about January’s record-low Arctic sea ice

    February 22, 2018

    January 2018 brought record-low sea ice cover to the Arctic, according to new data released by the US government. That’s bad news for the ocean, wildlife, and local communities that rely on both for survival.

    Ice melting in Bering Strait
  • Remarkable video shows how minke whale feeds

    February 20, 2018

    For the first time ever, scientists in Antarctica attached a camera to a minke whale and captured incredible evidence of how it feeds. The camera – one of three “whale cams” funded by WWF-Australia – is part of efforts by scientists to better protect whale feeding areas in Antarctica.

    minke whale Antarctic
  • Artificial nests bring new hope for vulnerable shy albatross

    February 15, 2018

    Dozens of fluffy shy albatross chicks sitting on artificial nests are a promising sign for scientists behind an innovative plan to give the vulnerable species a boost to help counteract the negative impacts of climate change.

    A pair of shy albatross in a nest
  • Conservation on the move

    February 07, 2018

    Through games. a mobile library, and a series of lessons, WWF's Mobile Education Unit helps students learn how to protect forests and prevent conflict with elephants and tigers. 

    children gathered for mobile education unit in Sumatra
  • Dams planned along the Mura River would devastate the “Amazon of Europe”

    February 05, 2018

    The Mura river—a relatively connected stretch of water that serves as one of the last refuges for wildlife and rare fish like otters and the Danube salmon—is at significant risk of dam development.

    Mura river from above
  • How would offshore oil and gas drilling in the Arctic impact wildlife?

    The Trump administration called for the removal of crucial Arctic protections in a new draft proposal of where oil and gas companies can purchase leases for offshore drilling. Take a look at how a handful of the Arctic’s abundant wildlife would be impacted by offshore drilling and a potential oil spill in the Arctic.

    Arctic fox licks nose
  • 5 interesting facts about the Pantanal, the world’s largest tropical wetland

    January 31, 2018

    At more than 42 million acres, the Pantanal is the largest tropical wetland— and one of the most pristine—in the world.

    Pantanal at sunset
  • South Africa’s rhino poaching trends show a slight decrease—but death toll remains too high

    January 29, 2018

    New 2017 rhino poaching numbers out of South Africa show a small decrease from the previous year, but the death toll remains perilously high.

    Two black rhinos in South Africa
  • Saving the Cerrado, Brazil’s vital savanna

    January 25, 2018

    As of Jan. 25, 61 of the world's largest food companies have committed to working to halt deforestation in the Cerrado. 

    fields in the Cerrado
  • Gorilla twins of Dzanga-Sangha turn 2 years old

    January 25, 2018

    Inganda and Inguka are the first twins born to habituated western gorillas in the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas complex in the Central African Republic. Their second birthday is a reminder of the important work of the Primate Habituation Program.

    Gorilla twins Inganda and Inguka with their mother