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Pollution Stories

Gabby Ahmadia, senior marine scientist at WWF, surveys a reef in the Selat Dampier MPA, Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia

What we learned about coral reefs in 2019

While most of what we learned about coral reefs in 2019 is grim, there's still hope. In this new decade, we can do quite a bit to protect coral reefs and the wildlife and people that depend on them.

  • This simple bottled water alternative is a no-brainer

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    Since less than 10% of plastic waste gets recycled in the US, most of those water bottles wind up in dumps, where they won’t break down for hundreds of years. Here's how to reduce your plastic waste.
    Reusing bottle
  • What do sea turtles eat? Unfortunately, plastic bags.

    Plastic has only been mass-produced since the 1940s, but it’s having a devastating impact on sea turtles. Many of us are doing our part to reduce plastic pollution by recycling and reducing single-use items, but governments must also step up to take accountability and end this pollution epidemic.

    A turtle swims toward a plastic bag
  • Plastic in the ocean

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    The problem of plastic in nature, particularly in our oceans, is a global crisis. Learn what WWF is doing to stop plastics from leaking into our oceans.
    Garbage in ocean
  • A photographer saves a turtle; his photograph may save more

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    It was a clear, calm day at the end of summer.
    Turtle caught in net
  • Stemming the tide

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Lauren Spurrier, vice president for oceans conservation, describes how our seas are transforming in unprecedented, life-altering ways—and lays out how WWF is working to save them for us all.
    Walrus crowded on sea ice
  • Gallery: Art by Mandy Barker

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Mandy Barker grew up collecting shells and driftwood on the beach near her home on the British coast. Now, she collects plastic.
    SOUP: BURNT
  • How tagging whales can help us understand ocean pollution

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2019
    Microplastics have accumulated abundantly in the Mediterranean. WWF is analyzing traces of plastic we find in whales to understand the strain that rising pollution puts on our oceans and marine life.
    Whale with arrow
  • An uninhabited Australian island littered with plastic

    May 16, 2019

    A tiny, remote island, visited only by nesting turtles and crocs, situated in the middle of nowhere, is now choking with plastic. 

    plastic at Millman RSwwfau12358
  • We’re one step closer to keeping trash and plastic out of our oceans

    October 18, 2018

    Nearly 124,000 WWF activists from 49 states reached out to their member of Congress to support a bipartisan bill to take a stand on ocean plastic, and their impressive efforts paid off.

    humback whale jump
  • LEGO Group builds a more sustainable future

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2018
    These iconic interlocking toys have long since evolved beyond rectangular bricks.
    object lego2 winter2018
  • 7 ways you can help save the ocean

    June 06, 2018

    Covering more than 70% of our planet’s surface, the ocean contains the largest diversity of life on Earth and affects everything from global weather patterns to food systems. Learn what steps you can take help protect the ocean. 

    ecuador ocean WW288186 Antonio Busiello
  • A resourceful hermit crab finds an unlikely home

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2017
    In 2010, I was hiking along a forested trail in Japan, when a shiny object caught my eye. I couldn’t believe what I saw: A land hermit crab was using a discarded plastic bottle cap for its shell.
    Hermit Crab with plastic bottle shell
  • Saving Colombia's daredevil fish

    Fishers have been noticing dramatic changes to the Orinoco River, and the daredevil fish in particular. In short, they're harder to find and no longer travel as far upstream. In an effort to save Colombia’s migratory fish, WWF-Colombia, the National Authority for Aquaculture and Fisheries (AUNAP), and other partners are focused on promoting more sustainable fishing practices throughout the supply chain. And, with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), WWF is trying to shed more light on the health of rivers and their vast biodiversity through projects like the basin report card.

    A man fishing on the Orinoco River in Colombia.
  • Capturing freshwater stories through the lens of a camera

    March 22, 2016

    Since 2011, photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz has travelled to eight countries capturing images for his long-term photographic project highlighting the global water crisis. Collectively, the photographs chart the diverse and far reaching effects of urbanization, poor sanitation, pollution, water scarcity, and the side effects of expanding industry and population.

    Women collecting water
  • An End to Great Barrier Reef Dumping Is Imminent

    July 01, 2015

    A full ban on dumping in the Great Barrier Reef should come to fruition in a matter of months. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Committee has voted to maintain pressure on Australia to deliver on its promise to restore the health of the reef.

    Great Barrier Reef fish
  • Better Choices at the Great Barrier Reef

    October 27, 2014

    For decades, the Great Barrier Reef has enjoyed World Heritage Status and been synonymous with diving, tourism and with Australia. But in June of this year, UNESCO threatened to downgrade the Great Barrier Reef to the World Heritage ‘In Danger’ list; a category populated predominantly by war-torn and developing nations. The final decision should be made in 2015.

    aerial great barrier reef
  • Depending on Clean Water: Five Freshwater Animals

    March 13, 2014

    WWF understands the importance of clean and healthy freshwater ecosystems for a thriving planet. So who are these animals that live in and around freshwater? 

    amazon river dolphin travel
  • WWF Takes the Wheel on Arctic Shipping

    May 14, 2013

    As climate change melts Arctic sea ice, the Bering Strait is seeing a marked increase in shipping traffic. WWF is taking action to ensure that development in the Arctic occurs in an environmentally and socially responsible way.

    Ship in Arctic