Climate Stories

  • A cross-sector initiative looks to transform industrial emissions

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2022
    The Renewable Thermal Collaborative (RTC) seeks to slash carbon emissions from industry and other large energy buyers by scaling up renewable alternatives for providing thermal energy.
    Internal structure of a larger thermal power plant with metal pieces and a bright sky
  • Mangroves as a solution to the climate crisis

    January 04, 2022

    Mangroves, with their incredible ability to capture and store carbon, can be a solution to the climate crisis.

    A mangrove forest with aerial roots emerging from the water
  • Reflecting on COP26

    November 16, 2021

    WWF's SVP Climate Change, Marcene Mitchell, shares her thoughts on the 26th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

    David Bebber
  • Humanitarianism and environmentalism: what’s next in a changing world

    As the climate crisis fuels more intense disasters, environmental issues and humanitarian needs are growing increasingly intertwined. WWF's Anita van Breda takes some time to reflect on the past and look toward the future.

    Destruction in the aftermath of a typhoon
  • People gather under a tree to discuss data for the Climate Crowd
  • Fire management

    September 08, 2021

    Wildfires are growing increasingly devastating and are both contributing to and being exacerbated by the worsening climate crisis. But there are ways that we can better manage fires so to mitigate their damage and protect communities and wildlife. 

    A forest on fire
  • The home and life of Mongolian nomadic herders

    August 26, 2021

    Living in a ger, meaning 'home' in Mongolia, and more commonly referred to as a 'yurt' in English, has grown popular in many places around the world. But its origin lies in central Asia, particularly across the steppes of Mongolia. Set up to be a portable home, the ger has been a traditional part of the life of nomadic herders here for millennia. But this way of life is threatened by the climate crisis.

    A group of people on horseback in a row smile and look at the camera
  • The climate crisis is here, but we can still turn the tide

    August 16, 2021

    My hope for the future is we look back and see the summer of 2021 as the turning point in the climate crisis—the moment when humanity took account of what we are doing and changed course.

    Two wind turbines on a mountain in Alaska with a setting sun and mountains in the background
  • UN report shows human activity has changed the planet forever

    August 09, 2021

    A new comprehensive report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessing the latest state of global climate science reveals that global temperatures now hover around 1.1°C above preindustrial levels and our actions have already irreversibly altered the Earth.

    Firefighters fight a large fire burning in the hills.
  • How artificial watering holes help wildlife survive Mexico's changing climate

    July 21, 2021

    WWF is launching a new project to make wildlife like tapirs less vulnerable to drought during the dry season by installing and monitoring artificial water sources in Mexico’s Calakmul Biosphere Reserve through the Wildlife Adaptation Innovation Fund.

    A tapir walks on dead leaves through the forest
  • Fortune 500 companies are acting on the climate crisis—but is it enough?

    June 02, 2021

    Sixty percent of Fortune 500 companies have set goals to act on the climate crisis and address energy use, yet those ambitions vary dramatically—and are not happening at the speed or scale needed to stave off the worst impacts of a warming planet, according to a new WWF report.

    A man working at solar power station
  • Biden administration releases US national climate plan

    April 22, 2021

    On Earth Day, the Biden administration took a big step forward by releasing the US national climate plan at the international Leaders Climate Summit that nearly doubles the previous administration's commitment with a pledge to cut US emissions by at least 50% from 2005 levels by 2030.

    Wide landscape shot of a large storm cloud rolling over green grassland
  • Advocating for climate-conscious air travel

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2021
    As more and more people take to the skies, scientists project that without advances in airplane efficiency and industry-wide regulations, commercial aviation emissions could triple by 2050.
    Large airplane silhouette
  • How will climate change affect marine megafauna?

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2021
    In other words: As ocean temperatures rise and habitats change, will whales, sharks, rays, dolphins, turtles, and other sea creatures adapt or go extinct?
    Humpback whale below surface
  • 3 ways President Biden should act on the climate crisis

    April 13, 2021

    On Earth Day 2021, President Biden will host an international Leaders Climate Summit to rally world leaders around climate change. The goal is for countries to commit to strong measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also strengthening their climate resilience plans. 

    The White House in Washington, DC
  • What are thermal emissions and how are they driving the climate crisis?

    February 09, 2021

    Thermal emissions are the greenhouse gases released from the processes of heating and cooling. Here are four things you need to know about them and what WWF is doing to tackle this challenge.

    Internal structure of a larger thermal power plant with metal pieces and a bright sky
  • The Bezos Earth Fund and WWF invest in solutions for the climate crisis

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    WWF received $100 million to accelerate the most promising nature-based solutions—methods that harness the power of nature to provide for communities and stabilize our climate.
    Landscape of river from above
  • Hazelnuts: great for the environment, but vulnerable to climate change

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    Hazelnuts are known for the rich, distinctive flavor they lend to some of our favorite treats, like chocolate and coffee. But this wonder crop is particularly vulnerable to climate change.
    Hazelnuts on tree
  • Testing the Waters

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    Investing in open-ocean seaweed farming could help move the needle on climate change.
    Seaweed underwater
  • Thinking Beyond:

    January 14, 2021

    If humans are unable to limit carbon pollution, Cincinnati’s average temperature could climb by as much as seven degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century, according to the National Centers for Environmental Information. From a local grassroots movement to engagement at the national level, this city is taking the fight against the climate crisis into its own hands.

    Sunny Cincinnati skyline
  • Tatyana Minenko, polar bear patrol team leader

    Every fall, the Ryrkaipiy polar bear patrol, with the support of WWF Russia, works to protect the community and prevent human-wildlife conflict. Tatyana Minenko has been leading the patrol team since 2006. That’s when the climate crisis increased conflict in her village.

    Closeup of a woman looking through binnoculars, wearing yellow gloves and a white hat, blurry background
  • 5 ways 'We Are Still In' kept the United States in the fight against the climate crisis

    We Are Still In led the United States in climate action by maintaining international leadership and increasing domestic ambition.

    solar panels on a building in Austin Texas
  • Climate Crowd

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    Pilot projects implemented in Zimbabwe work to address the impact of climate change and reduce pressure on natural ecosystems, benefiting the people and land alike.
    Aerial view of Victoria Falls with rainbow
  • Why climate change could be bad for beer

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    As erratic weather and droughts driven by climate change impact crops and freshwater, the world’s favorite fermented beverage could take a hit.
    Closeup of glass of beer