Tiger Stories

  • Four things to know about captive tigers in the US

    July 29, 2020

    We sit down with WWF's policy lead on wildlife conservation, Leigh Henry, to learn more about what the Big Cat Public Safety Act is and why it's critical for the protection of tigers.

    A large tiger lays down in a dark forest and stares into the camera
  • The snaring crisis in Southeast Asia

    July 01, 2020

    Illegal snaring is a rampant threat to wildlife and people in the forests of Southeast Asia. Snares are used to capture animals for the illegal wildlife trade. WWF-supported ranger patrols are working to address this crisis by removing snares. 

    Confiscated snares and traps in Cambodia.
  • Blood-free honey — How a safer harvesting program is reducing deadly human-tiger conflicts

    May 12, 2020

    WWF India, in association with the Sundarbans Biosphere Reserve (SBR) Directorate, has implemented a program to significantly reduce the number of tiger-related deaths of honey collectors.

    Honey collection in the Sundarbans
  • Tiger spotted at record-high elevation in Nepal

    April 28, 2020

    New camera trap images reveal the highest-elevation sighting of a tiger in Nepal, captured at over 8,000 feet in a densely forested area.

    Camera trap image of tiger at high elevation
  • Visiting a tiger farm in Southeast Asia—and what such places mean for wild tigers

    Leigh Henry and her colleagues from WWF’s Tiger’s Alive team visited Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam to continue the work of ending the illegal tiger trade and phasing out tiger farms.

    Tiger in a cage
  • 5 things Tiger King doesn’t explain about captive tigers

    March 31, 2020

    Tiger King, Netflix’s new docu-series, is roaring with popularity, but behind the drama, there is a frightful truth: captive tigers in the United States are a significant conservation issue and could impact tigers in the wild.

    Caged tiger, Indiana, United States
  • Citizen scientists help conserve Nepal’s tigers from behind the lens

    In Nepal, citizen scientists are working with biologists from WWF to help protect tigers, rhinos, elephants, and other wildlife found in Bardia National Park.

    Sabita Malla (front), tiger expert at WWF Nepal, is installing a camera trap with citizen scientists responsible for monitoring tigers in the Khata Corridor. Most visible citizen scientist here is Chabbi Thara Magar.
  • Nine reasons to feel hopeful for wildlife

    March 03, 2020

    In honor of World Wildlife Day, we celebrate some hopeful conservation stories to remind us actions make a difference and there’s still time to preserve our natural world if we all do our part.

    Tiger captured with camera trap
  • Celebrating good news for India's tigers

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    New tallies from the country’s 2018 tiger survey demonstrate a stable or growing population, estimated at 2,967 individuals, bringing hope for the species’ recovery.
    Tiger
  • A new protected area (PA) for tigers and leopards in Russia

    December 09, 2019

    More than 200,000 acres of a transboundary territory for tigers, leopards, and other species have been established in the Russian Far East as a new protected area.

    tiger in Komissarovsky Wildlife Refuge
  • Nine wins for tigers in the last nine years

    November 27, 2019

    Established in 2010 and dubbed Tx2, it is arguably the most ambitious effort ever undertaken to recover an endangered species. Today, the overall tiger population decline has begun to reverse, with better data and improved surveys indicating there are likely now close to 4,000 tigers roaming free across the range states.Here are the Tx2’s top nine achievements to date.

    Tiger
  • Malaysia's tigers on the brink of extinction

    November 25, 2019

    Tigers living on the Malayan Peninsula—a region that includes parts of Thailand, Malyasia, and Myanmar—are at risk of going extinct in just the next two to three years.

    Camera trap image of a Malayan tiger.
  • A camera trap captures an elusive tiger in Nepal

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    The spot where I captured this image is between two trees, giving a sense of depth, and one, a “marking tree,” has been scratched everywhere by tigers.
    Tiger
  • Turtles, tigers, and more species receive additional protections at global wildlife meeting

    September 11, 2019

    Governments from around the world recently gathered to discuss the threat of wildlife trade on species.

    Hawksbill turtle swimming underwater in North Madagascar.
  • In a blow to wildlife, China lifts a ban on the use of tiger and rhino parts

    October 29, 2018

    In an enormous setback for wildlife conservation, China announced it will allow hospitals to use tiger bone and rhino horn from captive-bred animals for traditional medicine. The decision reverses a decades-old ban that has been instrumental in preventing the extinction of endangered tigers and rhinos.

    Bengal Tiger in the Ranthambore National Park, India
  • Russia releases two Amur tigers into the wild

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2018
    In May, two Amur—or Siberian—tigers were released into Russia’s far eastern Evreiskaya Province, joining nine other rehabilitated tigers in the species’ historical habitat.
    fieldnotes tiger 3 winter2018
  • Nepal nearly doubles its wild tiger population

    In an amazing show of progress for wildlife, Nepal is on track to become the first of the world’s countries to double its wild tiger population since 2010.
    camera trap image of a tiger in Nepal
  • Rare footage shows successful tiger breeding

    July 30, 2018

    Rare footage of a tiger family offers exciting proof of tigers breeding successfully in the wild. The video shows a female tigress - named Rima - and her 3 cubs growing up in Central Sumatra. Rima then meets Uma, a male Sumatra tiger, and breeds successfully to have four more tiger cubs. Yet, tigers are endangered, facing a high risk of extinction in the wild. Today, there are only around 3,900 wild tigers worldwide. That’s more than a 95% decline from perhaps 100,000 just over a century ago.

    tiger footage Ministry of Environment and Forestry Indonesia
  • Sumatran tiger caught on camera

    July 29, 2018

    On top of a ridge of in Indonesia, a healthy male Sumatran tiger was spotted by camera traps earlier this year. An important conservation tool, the cameras are equipped with infrared sensors that take a picture whenever they sense movement in the forest and help support WWF’s intensive tiger monitoring in central Sumatra. 

    Sumatran tiger camera trap 3
  • An ambitious goal to help wild tigers thrive

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2018
    In a November 2016 story, WWF shared some good news: For the first time in a century, global tiger numbers had stopped declining and seemed to be on the rise.
    tiger Shutterstock / Luke Wait WW231899
  • Doubling tigers in Bhutan's Royal Manas National Park

    January 16, 2018

    In less than a decade, Bhutan’s Royal Manas National Park has achieved a big win for tiger conservation. From only 10 tigers in 2010, its population has now grown to 22. With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase matters. And it marks a significant step towards achieving the goal of doubling the world’s wild tigers.

    juvenile tiger in Royal Manas National Park
  • Tiger ranger, scientist, and detective

    November 30, 2017

    Pavel Fomenko is a man of the wilderness and tiger protector with WWF-Russia. Here is his story.

    Pavel Fomenko sets up camera trap
  • 4 unseen benefits of protecting tigers and their habitat

    November 29, 2017

    From the world’s largest mangrove forests in the Sundarbans to temperate forests in the snowy mountains of Bhutan, protecting tigers and their natural homes helps provide benefits for thousands of other animals and millions of people.

    tiger in tall grass
  • WWF's Matt Erke on landscape management in Nepal's most precious valley

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Matt Erke works on landscape management projects that restore forests, engage and benefit communities, and protect ecosystems critical for biodiversity in the Himalayas.
    insidetrack erke winter2017