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Wildlife Conservation Stories

Pavel Fomenko sets up camera trap

Tiger ranger, scientist, and detective

Pavel Fomenko is a man of the wilderness and tiger protector with WWF-Russia. Here is his story.

  • Most Chinese consumers support an upcoming ban on elephant ivory in China—if they know about it

    By the end of December, it will be illegal to sell or buy elephant ivory in China. But will the new and critical ban succeed in a country that’s home to the largest legal ivory market in the world?

    elephants stand close together
  • 4 unseen benefits of protecting tigers and their habitat

    November 29, 2017

    From the world’s largest mangrove forests in the Sundarbans to temperate forests in the snowy mountains of Bhutan, protecting tigers and their natural homes helps provide benefits for thousands of other animals and millions of people.

    tiger in tall grass
  • Creating a future for healthy forests in Bhutan

    November 11, 2017

    Bhutan now has a great means for bringing that commitment to life—long-term funding to ensure its protected areas, which cover half of the country, are properly managed forever. It is the first initiative of its kind in Asia and one of only a few in the world.

    Bhutanese mountains in sunset
  • New species of orangutan announced

    November 02, 2017

    A new great ape species—the Tapanuli orangutan—was officially announced by an international team of scientists today. With 800 or fewer individuals, the Tapanuli orangutan is the rarest of all great apes.

    Tapanuli orangutan
  • New photo evidence of snow leopards in northeast India

    October 23, 2017

    For perhaps the first time ever, a snow leopard was captured by a camera trap in a remote forest in the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. Arunachal Pradesh remains largely unexplored, making this photographic evidence of snow leopards especially significant. 

    snow leopard caught by camera trap
  • Saving vaquita: Retrieving ghost nets as dramatic new operation gets underway

    October 12, 2017

    In the Upper Gulf of California, scientists and fishermen work to protect the habitat of the world's smallest porpoise.

    Fisher pulling net from Gulf of Mexico
  • Brandon Davis uses improved tracking collars to keep African painted dogs roaming free

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Perhaps most rewarding part of Brandon Davis' career as an animal trainer and conservation ambassador has been educating people about animals and getting them excited about wildlife conservation.
    wilddog winter2017
  • WWF marks victories for wildlife in 2017

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Even as so many species faced both new and ongoing challenges, WWF tackled those threats head-on
    asian elephant winter2017
  • Uporny's Story

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Captured after close encounters with humans, Uporny the tiger was rehabilitated and released, offering researchers an unprecedented look into the wild life of an elusive big cat.
    Uporny looking at camera MagWinter2017 Matt Twombly
  • Baby rhino brings new hope to India’s Manas National Park

    September 22, 2017

    A baby rhino spotted alongside its mother in Manas National Park, located in the northeastern Indian state of Assam, is an encouraging new sign that the rhino population in the protected area is on the upswing.

    rhino and calf walk in Manas
  • Camera traps in Thailand reveal new tigers

    September 11, 2017

    Camera traps in Thailand's Mae Wong and Klong Lan National Parks reveal 16 new tigers— 6 cubs and 10 adults. 

    Adult tiger captured on a camera trap.
  • Bringing tigers back home to Kazakhstan

    September 08, 2017

    On September 8th, 2017, the Republic of Kazakhstan announced their plans to bring wild tigers back to their historical range in the Ili-Balkhash region, and signed a memorandum with WWF to implement a joint tiger reintroduction plan. These iconic cats will finally return to Kazakhstan, 70 years after going extinct there.

    A Bengal tiger in Bandhavgarh National Park, India
  • Fire-tailed titi monkey and pink river dolphin among 381 new species discovered in the Amazon

    The report, New Species of Vertebrates and Plants in the Amazon 2014-2015, details 381 new species that were discovered over 24 months, including 216 plants, 93 fish, 32 amphibians, 20 mammals, 19 reptiles and one bird.

    Pink river dolphin and calf.
  • The right to roam: elephant encounters at a wildlife corridor

    August 24, 2017

    Wildlife roam large areas and do not recognize human-imposed boundaries. They need help doing things like crossing busy roads. This incredible elephant encounter emphasized how important movement corridors are for wildlife. 

    elephants in Kaziranga
  • Supporters help WWF launch emergency plan to stop Myanmar’s elephant poaching crisis

    August 10, 2017

    Amid a dire poaching crisis, wild Asian elephants in Myanmar received swift and essential aid from thousands of WWF supporters committed to protecting this iconic species. More than 3,000 people donated $263,211 in less than four weeks to fund an emergency action plan to train rangers and get boots on the ground to fight wildlife crime.

    Tusked elephant
  • Meet Singye Wangmo, tiger protector

    July 27, 2017

    Singye Wangmo exudes a natural passion for wildlife. One of the few female forestry officers working on the ground in Bhutan, she spends her days protecting the tigers of Royal Manas National Park from poachers.

    Singye Wangmo checking a tiger pug mark.
  • Bringing back the Iberian lynx

    The Iberian lynx is the world's most endangered cat. In 2002, there were fewer than 100 left in the wild. WWF and its partners are working to restore the Iberian lynx to areas where it used to live. And where it could still flourish today - with a little help.

    Two young Iberian Lynx.
  • WWF and Tiger Beer engage to help rangers and protect tigers

    June 30, 2017

    WWF and Tiger Beer US are engaging in a campaign to fundraise to support rangers around the world, including those in tiger range countries to reduce the threat of poaching to this species. Tiger Beer will match up to $25,000 of consumer donations from July 1 through August 31, 2017 to support WWF's Back a Ranger Program.

    Tigers prancing and on hind legs.
  • An Amur tiger’s journey back into the wild

    June 29, 2017

    In mid-October of 2016, an Amur tiger was seen in the Russian city of Vladivostok. Despite efforts to capture him, he proved elusive, and gained international attention. On October 20th, he was finally captured and taken to a rehabilitation center. After being rehabilitated, he was released into his new home, Bikin National Park. 

    Male Amur tiger in the forest
  • Mexico commits to critical measures to save the vaquita

    June 08, 2017

    The government of Mexico announces a permanent ban on gillnets in the Upper Gulf of California - a fantastic and encouraging step forward in the path to saving the vaquita.

    Fins
  • In a disturbing new trend, poachers are killing Myanmar’s elephants for their skin, teeth, and tails

    June 06, 2017

    In a disturbing and growing new trend, Asian elephants of all ages are being slaughtered in Myanmar for their skin and other body parts. WWF is launching an emergency action plan to train, equip, and deploy 10 anti-poaching teams to the most vulnerable areas, and implementing a thorough plan to stop the slaughter. 

    Elephant and calf in river
  • Nepal successfully collars four snow leopards in four years

    May 17, 2017

    A snow leopard was successfully collared in Kangchenjunga Conservation Area on May 8, 2017 making it the fourth one to be collared in Nepal’s eastern snow leopard conservation complex.

    Collared snow leopard, Yalung.
  • Without global action, the world’s smallest porpoise could go extinct by 2018

    May 15, 2017

    With an estimated 30 or fewer remaining individuals, the vaquita are the focus of WWF’s new report calling for immediate, collective action to save the species from extinction. Prepared for WWF by Dalberg, Vanishing vaquita: saving the world’s most endangered marine mammal comes just before the two-year ban is due to expire at the end of May. 

    Fin
  • Helping people and wildlife thrive together

    May 12, 2017

    Human-wildlife conflict is a major issue for many poor people who live near forests in rural areas of Nepal. That’s one of the reasons why WWF and other partners in conservation launched the Hariyo Ban (Green Forest) program to find lasting solutions that protect people’s lives, livestock and crops and prevent the retaliatory killing of wildlife. 

    Newly installed fence in the Karnali corridor