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Wildlife Conservation Stories

  • Nine reasons to feel hopeful for wildlife

    March 03, 2020

    In honor of World Wildlife Day, we celebrate some hopeful conservation stories to remind us actions make a difference and there’s still time to preserve our natural world if we all do our part.

    Tiger captured with camera trap
  • Persian leopard activities are good news for leopard conservation

    Once virtually extinct in Russia, the Persian leopard is showing signs of a comeback in the region. Restoring a population takes time so each sighting of a leopard in the wild stirs excitement.

    Photo of a Persian Leopard on Mount Akhun taken by a camera trap
  • The fight to stop pangolin extinction

    An estimated 1 million pangolins were trafficked in the last ten years, though this number may be conservative given the volume of recent pangolin scale seizures. Learn what WWF and partners are doing to stop the extinction of this elusive mammal.

    CAPE PANGOLIN
  • Rhino poaching on the decline in South Africa

    Illegal killings of rhinos in South Africa are on the decline. In 2019, poachers killed 594 rhinos, down from 769 in the year prior, according to South Africa’s Department of the Environment, Forestry, and Fisheries.

    Two black rhinos in South Africa
  • Celebrating good news for India's tigers

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    New tallies from the country’s 2018 tiger survey demonstrate a stable or growing population, estimated at 2,967 individuals, bringing hope for the species’ recovery.
    Tiger
  • Newly patented technology helps save endangered black-footed ferrets

    WWF, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Model Avionics developed an innovative system to deliver plague protection for black-footed ferrets in the form of peanut butter-flavored baits by drones or all-terrain vehicles to prairie dogs. Recently, the team received a patent for the design—a first for WWF!

    drone flying and delivering bait
  • Solar-powered lights are helping both lions and livestock stay safe

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    Lions used to attack Kenyan farmer John Mpoe’s cattle almost nightly. Then he installed solar-powered LED lights around the pen where he keeps his livestock at night. He hasn’t lost a cow since.
    Mpoe and his solar light
  • Making a home for monarchs in Mexico

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    While monarchs are not endangered, their marvelous migration is at risk. Because they cluster in an area of just a few squares miles, loss of habitat to forest degradation has serious consequences.
    Monarch butterflies
  • Rapid Response Teams act as a bridge between wildlife and people

    January 16, 2020

    Established by WWF Nepal in 2016, RRTs help to engage communities in wildlife protection efforts, manage human-wildlife conflict, and monitor poaching and other illegal activities. Today, there are nearly 60 RRTs across Nepal.

    Narayan Shahi from the Rapid Response Team is arriving in a house to help villagers to deal with a wildlife conflict in Khata Corridor, Nepal.
  • What I saw at a Chinese tiger farm and what it means for wild tigers

    January 09, 2020

    Leigh Henry, WWF’s Director of Wildlife Policy, recently returned from a trip to China – the country where tiger farms started back in the 1980s. Leigh and her colleagues visited one of the world’s largest tiger farms– the Harbin Siberian Tiger Park – in the northeast corner of China. This is what she saw on her visit.

    Tiger Farm
  • Two years after China bans elephant ivory trade, demand for elephant ivory is down

    December 31, 2019

    Two years ago this month, China took the monumental step of banning elephant ivory trade within the country. Dec. 31, 2017 was the last day it was legal to buy or sell ivory there.

    African elephant.
  • Mountain gorilla numbers rise in a Central African protected forest

    A recent survey revealed the largest number of mountain gorillas ever recorded in a large swathe of protected forest in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. WWF and partners counted 459 individuals, up from an estimated 400 in 2011, in the 83,840-acre Bwindi-Sarambwe ecosystem.

    Portrait of gorilla in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest
  • New technology and collaboration could transform wildlife monitoring

    December 17, 2019

    Wildlife Insights is a one-of-a-kind cloud-based platform housing the largest publicly accessible database of camera trap images in the world. It allows researchers and conservation organizations around the world to share and analyze wildlife data to ultimately better anticipate threats, understand where and why wildlife populations are changing, and take action to protect wildlife.

    A curious grey Langur is getting close to a camera trap in Bardia National Park, Nepal.
  • Nine wins for tigers in the last nine years

    November 27, 2019

    Established in 2010 and dubbed Tx2, it is arguably the most ambitious effort ever undertaken to recover an endangered species. Today, the overall tiger population decline has begun to reverse, with better data and improved surveys indicating there are likely now close to 4,000 tigers roaming free across the range states.Here are the Tx2’s top nine achievements to date.

    Tiger
  • Malaysia's tigers on the brink of extinction

    November 25, 2019

    Tigers living on the Malayan Peninsula—a region that includes parts of Thailand, Malyasia, and Myanmar—are at risk of going extinct in just the next two to three years.

    Camera trap image of a Malayan tiger.
  • Rhinos around the world

    November 14, 2019

    2019 has been a year of both wins and losses for rhinos. Though still facing threats like poaching and habitat loss, the global rhino population has increased by 30 percent over the past decade.

    An Asian rhino (Rhinoceros unicornis) drinks by the waters edge at sunset. Kaziranga National Park, India.
  • Welcome home! Bison released into new territory

    October 11, 2019

    Bison in Badlands National Park now have an additional 22,553 acres to roam thanks to a passionate group of supporters who want to see America’s national mammal thrive.

    Bison released into Badlands National Park
  • A camera trap captures an elusive tiger in Nepal

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    The spot where I captured this image is between two trees, giving a sense of depth, and one, a “marking tree,” has been scratched everywhere by tigers.
    Tiger
  • Emerging technology helps WWF monitor snow leopards

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    The population of snow leopards in Russia has remained stable for the past three years, according to a recent WWF survey. This may not seem groundbreaking, but it is, in fact, excellent news.
    Snow leopard
  • Protecting the habitats of lesser flamingos in East Africa

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    These birds benefit when their preferred lake habitats are protected. In the Lake Naivasha Basin, WWF is using an integrated approach to tackle water challenges and further conserve the lake.
    Flamingos
  • Where do rhinos live? And eight other rhino facts

    September 19, 2019

    One of WWF's rhino experts answers common questions about rhinos around the world.

    White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum), Kenya.
  • Turtles, tigers, and more species receive additional protections at global wildlife meeting

    September 11, 2019

    Governments from around the world recently gathered to discuss the threat of wildlife trade on species.

    Hawksbill turtle swimming underwater in North Madagascar.
  • Progress in closing elephant ivory markets

    August 12, 2019

    Singapore takes an important step in protecting species from illegal wildlife trade.

    African Bush Elephant (Loxodonta africana) in Linyanti Reserve, Botswana
  • Can we use social media to help save elephants?

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    For Chinese tourists traveling internationally, ivory demand has increased. WWF worked to combat that trend via a social media campaign focused on reaching travelers through Chinese social platforms.
    elephan summer2019