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Wildlife Conservation Stories

Bengal Tiger in the Ranthambore National Park, India

In a blow to wildlife, China lifts a ban on the use of tiger and rhino parts

In an enormous setback for wildlife conservation, China announced it will allow hospitals to use tiger bone and rhino horn from captive-bred animals for traditional medicine. The decision reverses a decades-old ban that has been instrumental in preventing the extinction of endangered tigers and rhinos.

  • Russia releases two Amur tigers into the wild

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2018
    In May, two Amur—or Siberian—tigers were released into Russia’s far eastern Evreiskaya Province, joining nine other rehabilitated tigers in the species’ historical habitat.
    fieldnotes tiger 3 winter2018
  • WWF's Elisabeth Kruger on polar bears, climate change, and indigenous communities

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2018
    Kruger leads WWF’s efforts to help polar bears and other Arctic marine mammals coexist alongside people in an increasingly warmer and ice-free Arctic.
    Portrait of Elisabeth Kruger
  • WWF’s Ming Yao on why China’s ivory trade ban matters

    September 28, 2018
    WWF spoke with Ming Yao, a member of WWF’s wildlife conservation team who has worked closely with ivory demand reduction projects, to learn more about her point of view on China’s ivory ban and how it has influenced consumer behavior in her country.
    elephant walking
  • An Amur tiger cub gets a new lease on life

    August 21, 2018

    Rescued after sustaining serious injuries to his nose and face from would-be poachers, Saikhan the “miracle tiger” has been released back into the forests of the Russian Far East.

    Amur tiger release WWF Russia
  • Orangutans in Sumatra learn to live in the wild

    August 17, 2018

    At the Frankfurt Zoological Society’s Orangutan Rehabilitation Center, orangutans are rehabilitated and released back into the wild. Rescued orangutans learn how to feed and fend for themselves in the lowland rainforests of central Sumatra—skills they never had the chance to pick up from their mothers.

    sumatran orangutan willy Neil Ever Osborne 3797
  • How many muscles does an elephant’s trunk have? And 6 other elephant facts

    August 10, 2018

    Elephants, found in both Africa and Asia, are vital to maintaining the rich biodiversity of the ecosystems that they share with other species. Here's a snapshot of what you should know about them.

    African elephant portrait
  • Kui Buri National Park’s only female ranger shatters stereotypes

    July 31, 2018

    In Thailand, women like Kwan remain a rarity. But neither this nor the voices alleging that women aren’t suited for the ranger lifestyle – which comprises long working hours in spartan and sometimes dangerous conditions, away from loved ones – have prevented her from living her truth.

    Woraya Makai (34) walks through the jungle during of a morning patrol together with a team of rangers. She’s the only female ranger deployed in Kui Buri and in charge of photographing and surveying the animals she’s seeing around the park.
  • Pavel Fomenko, leading tiger expert, prepares to examine a tiger.
  • The world’s rarest big cat grows in number

    April 13, 2018

    The Land of the Leopard National Park is the core area for the Amur leopard. New images documented 84 adult cats and 19 cubs inside the park. This is a significant increase since a 2000 census recorded just 30 cats, and a 2015 survey numbered only 70.

     

    camera trap image of Amur leopard
  • Collaring elephants in one of Africa's last great wildernesses

    April 03, 2018

    Thanks to satellite collars, 60 elephants will be monitored for better protection against poaching in one of the last great African wildernesses, Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve.

    elephant in Selous
  • South Africa’s rhino poaching trends show a slight decrease—but death toll remains too high

    January 29, 2018

    New 2017 rhino poaching numbers out of South Africa show a small decrease from the previous year, but the death toll remains perilously high.

    Two black rhinos in South Africa
  • Gorilla twins of Dzanga-Sangha turn 2 years old

    January 25, 2018

    Inganda and Inguka are the first twins born to habituated western gorillas in the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas complex in the Central African Republic. Their second birthday is a reminder of the important work of the Primate Habituation Program.

    Gorilla twins Inganda and Inguka with their mother
  • New US elephant ivory market study helps agencies better regulate trade

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    In 2016, the US government imposed a “near-total ban” on imports, exports, and domestic trade of African elephant ivory. The findings led to recommendations that could help the US regulate the trade.
    African elephant on a white background
  • WWF supporters rally to stop elephant poaching in Myanmar

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    More than 3,000 WWF supporters donated a total of $263,211 to fund 10 antipoaching teams targeting Myanmar’s most vulnerable areas.
    antipoaching mynmar spring2018
  • Looking out for orangutans in Sumatra

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    Thanks to a groundbreaking agreement between a WWF-founded company and the residents of a rain forest village, Sumatran orangutan habitat is more secure than it was just a few years ago.
    orangutan spring2018
  • Doubling tigers in Bhutan's Royal Manas National Park

    January 16, 2018

    In less than a decade, Bhutan’s Royal Manas National Park has achieved a big win for tiger conservation. From only 10 tigers in 2010, its population has now grown to 22. With a global population of as few as 3,890 wild tigers, every population increase matters. And it marks a significant step towards achieving the goal of doubling the world’s wild tigers.

    juvenile tiger in Royal Manas National Park
  • WWF is saving black rhinos by moving them

    December 14, 2017

    WWF’s Black Rhino Range Expansion Project (BRREP) has been working with passion, commitment, and determination for a brighter future for the critically endangered black rhino for more than a decade. BRREP works to grow black rhino numbers by creating new populations and provides equipment and training to rangers to monitor, manage, and protect rhinos.

    A rhino standing in a field
  • Protecting the elusive Sumatran rhino

    The Sumatran rhino is so rare and elusive that even the most senior of the rangers have never seen the animal in the wild. But just because you don’t see something doesn't mean it’s is not there.

    Sumatran rhino
  • Celebrating the biggest conservation wins of 2017

    December 13, 2017

    As 2017 comes to a close, we’re taking a moment to highlight some of our biggest conservation successes of the year. And we couldn’t have done it without your support.

    Myanmar Elephant Restricted Campaign
  • Most Chinese consumers support an upcoming ban on elephant ivory in China—if they know about it

    By the end of December, it will be illegal to sell or buy elephant ivory in China. But will the new and critical ban succeed in a country that’s home to the largest legal ivory market in the world?

    elephants stand close together
  • Tiger ranger, scientist, and detective

    November 30, 2017

    Pavel Fomenko is a man of the wilderness and tiger protector with WWF-Russia. Here is his story.

    Pavel Fomenko sets up camera trap
  • 4 unseen benefits of protecting tigers and their habitat

    November 29, 2017

    From the world’s largest mangrove forests in the Sundarbans to temperate forests in the snowy mountains of Bhutan, protecting tigers and their natural homes helps provide benefits for thousands of other animals and millions of people.

    tiger in tall grass
  • Creating a future for healthy forests in Bhutan

    November 11, 2017

    Bhutan now has a great means for bringing that commitment to life—long-term funding to ensure its protected areas, which cover half of the country, are properly managed forever. It is the first initiative of its kind in Asia and one of only a few in the world.

    Bhutanese mountains in sunset
  • New species of orangutan announced

    November 02, 2017

    A new great ape species—the Tapanuli orangutan—was officially announced by an international team of scientists today. With 800 or fewer individuals, the Tapanuli orangutan is the rarest of all great apes.

    Tapanuli orangutan