Wildlife Conservation Stories

  • 5 forest-dwelling wildlife species we love

    March 03, 2021

    Celebrating World Wildlife Day with 5 of our favorite wildlife species living in forest habitats around the world.

    A side view of an adult jaguar walking in front of large tangled tree branches
  • Small-scale dairy manufacturing provides local livelihood opportunities in western Mongolia

    February 02, 2021

    Dairy is a staple in the diets of Mongolian people but until recently, the sale of milk products was not a prominent source of income for local herders. As it turns out, diversifying community livelihood options in this village in the Bayan-ulgii province has also led to increased protections for snow leopards in the area. A win for people, and a win for nature.

    An adult yak stands with two baby yaks staring at the camera with a mountain range in the background
  • Conservation Reboot

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    Scientists around the world are harnessing the power of technology to address conservation challenges.
    Graphic of signals
  • A snaring crisis grips Southeast Asia, threatening its biodiversity

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    A deadly crisis is spreading across Southeast Asia, silently emptying forests of wildlife. Snaring impacts over 700 mammal species in the region, including rare animals such as the Asian elephant.
    Elephant line illustration
  • A sign of a balancing ecosystem, the Himalayan lynx returns to its ancestral home

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    As the markhor, a key food source for the lynx, has returned, so has the lynx, and its reappearance is being celebrated as a sign that the ecosystem’s natural balance is on the mend.
    Lynx walking on rocky ground
  • Tatyana Minenko, polar bear patrol team leader

    Every fall, the Ryrkaipiy polar bear patrol, with the support of WWF Russia, works to protect the community and prevent human-wildlife conflict. Tatyana Minenko has been leading the patrol team since 2006. That’s when the climate crisis increased conflict in her village.

    Closeup of a woman looking through binnoculars, wearing yellow gloves and a white hat, blurry background
  • Meet Dr. Jacques Flamand

    January 06, 2021

    WWF-South Africa's wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Jacques Flamand, has dedicated his career to the protection and conservation of South Africa's iconic species, including the critically endangered black rhino.

    A man touching a black rhino that is waking up after being sedated
  • How honey can help protect tigers in China

    December 29, 2020

    WWF donated nearly 400 beehives to residents in the continental tiger range and organized training on beekeeping. Investing in their futures is also an investment in the conservation of tigers.

    A man looks at honeycomb with bees flying around
  • Securing a future for wild tigers

    December 22, 2020

    The tiger is making a comeback—learn about a few tiger champions who are helping this iconic species to recover.

    Close up portrait of an adult tiger in tall green reeds looking at the camera with its mouth open
  • New Facebook alert informs users about wildlife trafficking

    December 21, 2020

    Since 2016, Facebook and WWF have been working together to address wildlife trafficking by detecting and removing illicit activity that fuels the trade in wildlife and its products on one of the largest social media platforms in the world. As part of this effort, Facebook launched a new pop-up interstitial alert message that will inform users about illegal wildlife trade when certain wildlife-related search words are entered.

    A barbary macaque sits in a tree looking up
  • An Eye on Recovery

    December 17, 2020

    WWF is helping to support Australia’s first large-scale collaborative camera trap project.

    Two men crouching down on the ground to set up netting and a camera to capture images of wildlife passing by
  • Meet Dr. Parikshit Kakati, WWF India’s wildlife veterinary specialist

    December 15, 2020

    Dr. Parikshit Kakati, WWF India’s wildlife veterinary specialist, plays a key role during the flood season in Assam, India, as part of a team that rescues and treats injured wild animals.

    A vet tends to an elephant that is safely tranquilized and laying on the ground
  • 100 bison find a new home with the Rosebud Sioux Tribe

    October 30, 2020

    The Tribe will create the largest native-owned and managed bison herd in North America. These 100 bison are the first of as many as 1,500 animals setting foot on 28,000 acres of native grassland.

    Bison walk out into a brown field
  • Investing in "Thirty Hills"

    October 27, 2020

    Thirty Hills is the last large block of intact, lowland forest still standing in central Sumatra. After five years of successful forest conservation, we celebrate five major wins within this critically important landscape.

    The Bukit Tigapuluh, or “Thirty Hills,” landscape is one of the last great stands of rain forest in the deforestation hotspot that is the Indonesian island of Sumatra
  • Ghost fishing gear

    October 20, 2020

    Ghost fishing gear includes any abandoned, lost, or otherwise discarded fishing gear. It is the deadliest form of marine plastic debris and often goes unseen. Learn more about how you can help stop this silent killer and protect the health of our ocean its inhabitants.

    A large seal on the beach with its neck caught in abandoned fishing gear
  • Crossing Paths

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    As seasonal waters ebb and flow, the movements of elephants and other wildlife follow.
    African elephant facing camera
  • Common Ground

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    Tawau, the east malaysian district where Christina Ak Lang grew up, is a tropical paradise.
    Aerial photo of palm field
  • Flow Lines

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    Keeping water flowing for people and wildlife in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area will take action at every level. Here's what WWF is doing for it.
    Aerial photo of three elephants wading through water
  • Employing AI to evaluate wildlife populations on a global scale

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    Launched in December 2019 by Google and a host of conservation partners, Wildlife Insights offers a simple upload system, cloud-based storage, and AI tagging and analysis.
    Wildlife Insights logo
  • Monitoring jaguars to help ensure their long-term survival

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    In 2017, WWF-Peru began monitoring jaguars in the Napo-Putumayo Corridor to gain crucial insights that could help protect the species longterm.
    Jaguar walking close to camera
  • After 51 years, swift foxes return to the grasslands of Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Montana

    September 24, 2020

    Twenty-seven swift foxes were brought to the area from Wyoming in September, marking the beginning of a five-year reintroduction program led by the Assiniboine (Nakoda) and Gros Ventre (Aaniiih) Tribes of Fort Belknap.

    A reintroduced swift fox stands in tall yellow grasses
  • Do you know what's really on your plate?

    July 23, 2020

    Today, there are over 400 known endangered marine and freshwater species linked to human consumption. Being mindful of what species are at risk in the marine and freshwater environments can help you protect these animals from disappearing for good and enjoy your seafood responsibly.

    Bluefin tuna sushi sitting on a plate
  • The snaring crisis in Southeast Asia

    July 01, 2020

    Illegal snaring is a rampant threat to wildlife and people in the forests of Southeast Asia. Snares are used to capture animals for the illegal wildlife trade. WWF-supported ranger patrols are working to address this crisis by removing snares. 

    Confiscated snares and traps in Cambodia.
  • A landmark snow leopard collaring in Nepal

    May 21, 2020

    Elusive and solitary nature, snow leopards are rarely spotted and even less frequently studied within their rugged and harsh habitat. However last November, two snow leopards were captured, fitted with satellite-GPS collars, and successfully released back into their rocky homeland in Western Nepal. The two male snow leopards were the first since the 1980’s to be fitted with collars within Shey Phoksundo National Park in Western Nepal.

    Collared snow leopard on rocky terrain in high mountains of Western Nepal