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Amazon Stories

Aerial view of Amazon

Protecting progress in the Brazilian Amazon

This will be one of the great litmus tests of the conservation movement: can we marshal the resources necessary to secure the gains we’ve made in the Amazon and chart a new path forward?

  • Staying strong for the Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Scientists are discovering an average of one new species in the Amazon every other day.
    bird reveal winter2017
  • Why Colombia’s Sandra Valenzuela never gives up on fighting for peace and protecting the land

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Valenzuela has spent almost half her life dedicated to a more peaceful Colombia, and particularly to how conservation can help the country achieve that peace.
  • A look at the natural world of Colombia

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Heritage Colombia is a conservation financing project designed to secure protections for Colombia’s natural landscapes.
    colombia map labels new winter2017
  • Heritage Colombia

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    With the peace agreement comes the opportunity to restore the health of the country’s protected areas and prevent damage or loss to the many wild wonders that still exist.
    colomia birds winter2017
  • Fire-tailed titi monkey and pink river dolphin among 381 new species discovered in the Amazon

    The report, New Species of Vertebrates and Plants in the Amazon 2014-2015, details 381 new species that were discovered over 24 months, including 216 plants, 93 fish, 32 amphibians, 20 mammals, 19 reptiles and one bird.

    Pink river dolphin and calf.
  • What animals live in the Amazon? And 8 other Amazon facts

    April 03, 2017

    The Amazon is an incredibly unique place. It is the world’s largest rain forest and river system, and the most biologically diverse place on Earth. It contains millions of species, most of them still undescribed. Learn more about this amazing place.

    aerial view of the amazon rainforest
  • Researchers use drones to count river dolphins in Brazil

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2017
    On a river in Brazil, a quadcopter drone whirred over the water, transmitting a stream of images to a computer. Researchers and the small aircraft had the same job: spotting river dolphins.
    Dolphin Magazine Summer2017
  • WWF's Meg Symington on seeding innovation in the Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2017
    The innovative tool, known as Project Finance for Permanence, has provided a brilliant approach to cover the costs associated with maintaining protected areas in Brazil.
    Meg Symington Instde Track Spring 2017
  • The story of soy

    December 14, 2016

    Behind beef, soy is the second largest agricultural driver of deforestation worldwide. From the Northern Great Plains of the U.S. to the Amazon of Brazil, forests, grasslands, and wetlands are being plowed up to make room for more soy production. 

    Mass soybean harvesting at a farm in Brazil
  • The Amazon's athletic animals

    August 04, 2016

    The Amazon’s animal athletes demonstrate skill and strength humans can only envy.

    Amazon jaguar
  • Monkey looking in taxi mirror.
  • Managing the forest factory

    Eduardo Escompani Viñas is a shiringuero; he collects natural latex from shiringa trees. He and the other members of ECOMUSA, a cooperative of natural rubber producers, feel duty-bound to protect their natural resources and their way of life. They demonstrate that there are ways to reap the value and benefit of forests without harming them.

     

    Man getting latex from a tree
  • Financing conservation

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    WWF’s plan to secure a permanent future for some of the highest-priority protected areas on Earth
    Project Finance illustration
  • Capturing atmospheric data in the Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    Capturing atmospheric data in the Amazon
    ATTO tower in the Amazon
  • Flavors of Nature: Food from the protected areas of Peru

    December 03, 2015

    A growing number of cooks in Peru rely on the country’s protected areas—parks, nature reserves, and sanctuaries—to keep their menus vibrant and their customers satisfied. That's part of why WWF is working with the Peruvian government and partners to fund the proper management of protected areas.

    chef cooking in Peru
  • Collaborating to permanently protect Peru's natural treasures

    Public, private, national, and international partners, including WWF, are working on a way to fund the permanent protection of Peru’s natural treasures. Such funds could be used to conduct wildlife surveys, create jobs in ecotourism, and purchase equipment that enables park rangers to better patrol protected areas.

    forest in peru
  • Twenty-Five Years in the Amazon

    August 25, 2015

    WWF's Meg Symington describes the luck and rewards of working to save the Amazon rain forest.

    Amazon
  • Deforestation in Peru

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2015
    How indigenous communities, government agencies, nonprofits and businesses work together to stop the clearing of forests
    Rain drenched village in Peru
  • 11 of the world’s most threatened forests

    April 27, 2015

    The Amazon, central Africa, the Mekong. These are home to some of the world’s most species-rich, culturally significant and stunningly beautiful forests. But large swaths of these forests, and many others around the world, may not be there in 15 years if we don’t do more to save them.

    miombo woodlands
  • Monkey Swinging through the Rain Forest

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2015
    A shaky platform allows a snapshot that soars
    Silvery woolly monkey jumping
  • Amazon River Cruise

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2014
    The sounds and silences of floating down the Amazon
    boat in amazon
  • Protecting the Amazon for Life

    May 21, 2014

    A model for conservation, the Amazon Region Protected Areas ensures 150 million acres—three times the size of all US parks combined—of the Amazon are protected for life.

    Amazon
  • Listen in on the conversation about our world

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2014
    WWF is only one voice among many
  • The Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2014
    Journey into the world’s largest tropical forest—and uncover one of the biggest conservation initiatives the world has ever seen.
    Aerial View of Amazon